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In preparation of my first lockdown...

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by mtnkids, Jan 2, 2010.

  1. mtnkids

    mtnkids Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 19, 2009
    Southeast Iowa
    Okay, my eggs are due on the 9th. Now that I am getting closer to my first "lockdown" I sure want to make sure I do things as close to "perfect" as possible.

    I have had the eggs in styrofoam egg cartons from the beginning. Turning 3 times a day. At the top of the eggs my average temperatures have been in the 100-101 range, which I realize now may have been a little on the cool side and in the last couple days have been going more for 101.5 average. I have kept the humidity at about 30-40%. I have had one of the two vent plugs removed from the bator (little giant still air).

    My plan is to, on day 18 (right when day 19 is beginning):
    1)add shelf liner over the wire mesh.
    2)Take the eggs out of the cartons and lay them on their sides. (I may seperate them with tupperware containers as I hear chicks that hatch out first can be a little rough on their slower friends. Tips on this are welcome!)
    3)remove the second vent plug or put the first one back??? Help on this one too!
    4)Raise the humidity to between 60-70%
    5)Bite what is left of my fingernails off!

    I'm quite certain I am forgetting something here.[​IMG]
     
  2. Paganbird

    Paganbird CrescentWood Farm

    Apr 25, 2009
    Western Pa
    I have had the eggs in styrofoam egg cartons from the beginning. Turning 3 times a day. At the top of the eggs my average temperatures have been in the 100-101 range, which I realize now may have been a little on the cool side and in the last couple days have been going more for 101.5 average. I have kept the humidity at about 30-40%. I have had one of the two vent plugs removed from the bator (little giant still air).

    Low temps may result in a late hatch... maybe a day or two. Don't get too concerned if they don't hatch exactly when you expect them to. Just keep the 'bator locked down... Don't Open It!

    1)add shelf liner over the wire mesh.

    That's a good idea... easy to clean up.
    2)Take the eggs out of the cartons and lay them on their sides. (I may seperate them with tupperware containers as I hear chicks that hatch out first can be a little rough on their slower friends. Tips on this are welcome!)

    I usually let them hatch out in cartons... paper ones, though.
    3)remove the second vent plug or put the first one back??? Help on this one too!

    Take them out... more air flow for the hatch.
    4)Raise the humidity to between 60-70%

    Cut up sponges if you have trouble getting the humidity up.
    5)Bite what is left of my fingernails off!

    Now, here is where you're going wrong. I wouldn't recommend biting off your fingernails. Just don't open the 'bator & you'll be fine.

    Good Luck!​
     
  3. duckluck

    duckluck Dulcimyrh Ducks

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    188
    Oct 22, 2009
    Illinois
    Somebody correct me if I'm wrong here, but...

    I have had the eggs in styrofoam egg cartons from the beginning.

    I don't think that's any good...I was always told to keep eggs contained in something, preferably egg trays or egg trays cut down, or at the very worst cardboard egg trays/cartons with ventilation holes. It seems to me that styrofoam might help hold the heat of the egg better but also will prevent proper ventilation and air circulation around the egg, as well as humidity evaporation from the egg so that the air cells develop properly for hatching. Thoughts?​
     
  4. dovecanyon

    dovecanyon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 15, 2009
    Niland, CA
    Aren't you supposed to cut small holes in the bottom of each cup in the egg carton? If you do this to help circulation, would it make a difference if you used paper or foam cartons? I have not hatched in cartons, put the eggs on their sides for lockdown, but am planning to try the carton hatch this time, so I am interested also. Wouldn't the paper cartons absorb a lot of the humidity? Seems the foam would make it easier to keep the humidity up? I'm still learning, so this is very interesting to me as well.
     
  5. Paganbird

    Paganbird CrescentWood Farm

    Apr 25, 2009
    Western Pa
    I use paper pulp cartons. Never had trouble with humidity being 'absorbed' by them.
    I don't have any experience with foam cartons, but I would have at least cut holes in the bottom.
    Either way, I don't think the carton type would have as much effect on the hatch as the temp being too low throughout incubation. I don't think it matters at this point. If you plan on keeping them in the foam, though, you may want to cut the bottoms off the cups for better air circulation.
     
  6. mtnkids

    mtnkids Out Of The Brooder

    74
    0
    39
    Dec 19, 2009
    Southeast Iowa
    Oh, I did cut holes in the bottom of the styrofoam cartons. I almost cut the bottoms off to give enough circulation. Also the top I cut off of them too. I used the styrofoam instead of the cardboard type because I didn't want them to absorb too much humidity. I had 5 of them in cardboard carton at first and it stayed wet. After culling some clear eggs I moved them into the stryofoam and took the cardboard out. Is that better than how it originally sounded? [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2010
  7. Paganbird

    Paganbird CrescentWood Farm

    Apr 25, 2009
    Western Pa
    LOL!
    Sounds like you have it all under control!
    You should be just fine.
    Good Luck!
     

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