In your opinion...

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by frstimeflock, Jan 8, 2017.

  1. frstimeflock

    frstimeflock Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 31, 2015
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    How many hens would you put in a 15' x 15' coop?
    I'm wanting to combine mine to one coop but not sure how many can fit! Thanks!
     
  2. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    What breeds? Established flock or integrate two different flocks?
     
  3. frstimeflock

    frstimeflock Out Of The Brooder

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    All different breeds, all in 3 different coops
     
  4. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    But what breeds specifically? To assess space needs, it kind helps to know if they are jumbo breeds like Brahmas or light breeds like Leghorns.
     
  5. frstimeflock

    frstimeflock Out Of The Brooder

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    EE, buff orps, silver laced Wyandotte, cuckoo Maran, black australorp
     
  6. Sseckel

    Sseckel Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My coop is 8 x 11 with an 11 x 14 run and I keep 22 hens in there plus a rooster. 3 are silkies then 18 are a grab bag of wyandots, barred rocks, RIRs, production reds, easter eggers and a banty rooster. I also have 3 serama that join them every summer in their coop before vacationing in our basement over the winter. Never had a problem with crankiness.

    Dont forget your coop is 3 dimensional. the general 4-8 sq ft per bird only considers the floor space. Put in different height levels of "activities" ie, swings, perches, snack areas, whatever. I have a 2nd "floor" in my coop in one corner that is 24 inches off the ground level that provides and extra 30 sq ft of space. If you get creative with the inside of your coop you dont necessarily have to increase your footprint. As long as you have places for your hens to get space from each other you can be flexible with the general space requirements as long as you are vigilant, provide entertainment and are ok with cleaning a bit more often.
     
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  7. 4 ft. x 4 ft. per chicken using this formula 14 chickens would be the answer larger breeds 5ft. x 5ft. which would be 9 in a space that size . in your area during cold days like we're having now some chickens will not leave the coop. You have to take that into account when calculating space for chickens . Over crowding leads to slow growth feed waste and causing problems like feather pickers and egg eaters . Covered runs will ease the problem some what . They just need plenty of room to move around and be able to escape the more dominate chickens in the pecking order . If your chickens free range during the day and only roost and or lay in the coop then you can get by with squeezing a few more in a smaller space . But again during really cold days some won't leave shelter .
     
  8. pistolero

    pistolero Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 24, 2016
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    15x15=225 ft2, 225 divided by 5 = 45. If they have adequate run space outside, you could easily keep 36-50 in there.

    You would need a big run. 4 or 5 square feet per bird inside and 10 square feet outside are recommended.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2017
  9. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    Three different flocks, all with their own established social order, all essentially strangers to one another, and all large breeds. I wouldn't try more than 37 in the 15x15 coop. Integration of different groups takes more space than one cohesive flock will. May be a bit rough for awhile, even with a few extra sq ft per bird.
     
  10. Egghead_Jr

    Egghead_Jr Overrun With Chickens

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    I don't subscribe to large coops. The run area is far more important. Big, huge, nearly free range size runs are nice. The birds will only squabble over the coop at roost time and that's going to happen with integration no matter how big the coop. Big runs, where they are nearly entire waking hours reduce integration stress and injuries. If you keep chickens locked up in coop or heat to promote them to stay inside it then you need a large coop as it essentially becomes the run. Otherwise, coops for roosting/laying and runs for everything else is where huge runs pay off. Keeps costs down and easier to provide the space which in the end is what the birds want in my observations.
     
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