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inbreeding....yes or no???

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by KooKoe, Dec 7, 2010.

  1. KooKoe

    KooKoe Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a question... Can my rooster breed with his daughters? Or can my hen's 'son' breed with her again? I have searched the net and can't seem to find a sure answer. everyone is really vague about it. It freaks me out a little, but that's coz I'm human. is it a problem in chicken and will it affect thier genes?
     
  2. Celtic Hill

    Celtic Hill Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 7, 2010
    Scotland CT
    Quote:There are topics on this, son to mother and daughter to father is called line breeding, in breeding is brother to sister.
     
  3. RAREROO

    RAREROO Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:There are topics on this, son to mother and daughter to father is called line breeding, in breeding is brother to sister.

    Yes, breeders do it all the time and most of the time it is necessary to line breed to keep up certain traits in a particular strain. So inbreeding is fine for a few generations.
     
  4. knjinnm

    knjinnm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sandia Park, NM
    See:
    http://bowlingsite.mcf.com/genetics/inbreeding.html

    Inbreeding and linebreeding

    What are inbreeding and linebreeding, and what effect do they have?

    In genetic terminology, inbreeding is the breeding of two animals who are related to each other. In its opposite, outcrossing, the two parents are totally unrelated. Since all pure breeds of animal trace back to a relatively limited number of foundation dogs, all pure breeding is by this definition inbreeding, although the term is not generally used to refer to matings where a common ancestor does not occur behind sire and dam in a four or five generation pedigree.

    Breeders of purebred livestock have introduced a term, linebreeding, to cover the milder forms of inbreeding. Exactly what the difference is between linebreeding and inbreeding tends to be defined differently for each species and often for each breed within the species. On this definition, inbreeding at its most restrictive applies to what would be considered unquestioned incest in human beings - parent to offspring or a mating between full siblings. Uncle-niece, aunt-nephew, half sibling matings, and first cousin matings are called inbreeding by some people and linebreeding by others.

    What does inbreeding (in the genetic sense) do? Basically, it increase the probability that the two copies of any given gene will be identical and derived from the same ancestor
     
  5. PineappleMama

    PineappleMama Chillin' With My Peeps

    Thanks for asking this KooKoe, and thanks for the answers too.

    I kinda assumed that breeders would HAVE to do this to get certain traits, but figured there was also the risk of flaws being doubled as well. But since we aren't breeding (can't have roos) it was rather a moot point right now. Still, very nice to know so thankee all.
     
  6. KooKoe

    KooKoe Chillin' With My Peeps

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    thanx guys!!!!! I always find what I need at BYC!!!!!
     
  7. catdaddyfro

    catdaddyfro Overrun With Chickens

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    Vernon Parish
    I've read in something recently about line breeding/ in-breeding that you could possibly cross the progeny/and parents back and forth for 8 generations before possibly having any genetic problems( unless theres a bad trait/flaw that is already being concentrated) as the poultry (bird) gene pool is not as closely related such as humans and other creatures might be. Seems like the 8 generations of crossing back is the number it takes to breed back to a pure breed or type. Maybe the genetic gurus might can bring some inlightenment in on this. If I find that info I'll try to post it on here somwhere.

    KooKoe your alright for quite some time even on hatch-mates(ie. brother/sister) breeding. I have some RIreds(prod) that are results of bro/sis crosses some of the best layers I ever had, bred them that way purposely for good gentics/traits and they look and act like perfectly good red egg layers [​IMG]

    I mean red chickens that lay brown eggs that is [​IMG] [​IMG]

    catdaddy
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2010
  8. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Quote:As you have seen, the answer is yes to both. What will happen is that certain traits or genes will be enhanced and certain traits or genes will be eliminated. Whether this is good or bad will depend on what traits you consider good. You have to be careful in selecting which chickens you select to breed so you don't encourage bad genes or traits.

    Something that a lot of people seem to not consider is that if you introduce a totally new chicken, you may be introducing bad genes to your flock as well as increasing genetic diversity. Any breeding program requires that you carefully select your breeders whether inbred, linebred, or new introductions.
     
    1 person likes this.
  9. catdaddyfro

    catdaddyfro Overrun With Chickens

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    Vernon Parish
    Quote:As you have seen, the answer is yes to both. What will happen is that certain traits or genes will be enhanced and certain traits or genes will be eliminated. Whether this is good or bad will depend on what traits you consider good. You have to be careful in selecting which chickens you select to breed so you don't encourage bad genes or traits.

    Something that a lot of people seem to not consider is that if you introduce a totally new chicken, you may be introducing bad genes to your flock as well as increasing genetic diversity. Any breeding program requires that you carefully select your breeders whether inbred, linebred, or new introductions.

    yeah, what Ridgerunner said: [​IMG]

    catdaddy
     
  10. KooKoe

    KooKoe Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:As you have seen, the answer is yes to both. What will happen is that certain traits or genes will be enhanced and certain traits or genes will be eliminated. Whether this is good or bad will depend on what traits you consider good. You have to be careful in selecting which chickens you select to breed so you don't encourage bad genes or traits.

    Something that a lot of people seem to not consider is that if you introduce a totally new chicken, you may be introducing bad genes to your flock as well as increasing genetic diversity. Any breeding program requires that you carefully select your breeders whether inbred, linebred, or new introductions.

    My mother is about to get a Japanese black tail bantam pair from a breeder. it's hard to say if the two birds are related, but I would naturally assume so. I would like a pair myself...so, if they breed and I am luck enough to get a rooster and a pullet, they would be brother and sister. If they were to breed again, in order for me to build up a good pullet to rooster ratio, then the rooster would be pairing with daughters. I was concerned that I might get one legged chicks with wings coming out thier ears....
     

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