Incubating Goose Eggs using Little Giant 9200 Still Air- Cross Posted

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Pudge, Feb 10, 2009.

  1. Pudge

    Pudge Out Of The Brooder

    52
    1
    31
    May 13, 2008
    Oklahoma
    Well, I put my instructions in a place I wouldn't forget.. problem is.. I forgot. [​IMG] I had a 85%hatch rate last year. I misted and cooled after day 5 until day 26.

    My questions is with the still air what temp do you set for halfway up the egg? I want to use the temp on the listed instructions for geese that came with it like I did last year. I am having a blond moment.

    any help would be very appreciated.
    I cross posted this in the geese forum.
     
  2. twigg

    twigg Cooped up

    Mar 2, 2008
    Tulsa
    Quote:99.5F

    It's often easier to measure at the top of the egg, but for goose eggs the temp needed would be higher than for chickens (the eggs are bigger)

    Can you get a forced air kit, or adapt a PC fan for this incubator .... it would make your job easier. You are already having a hard time because small, still air incubators are hard to maintain at a high humidity than are large, forced air ones.
     
  3. Pudge

    Pudge Out Of The Brooder

    52
    1
    31
    May 13, 2008
    Oklahoma
    I had really good luck last year after I read online that still air can be better for goose eggs. I am thinking of getting a forced air as well to give it a test run. I have 4 incubators and hatch quite a few of the little monsters last year along w/chicks and guineas.
     
  4. twigg

    twigg Cooped up

    Mar 2, 2008
    Tulsa
    Quote:lol .... you can read lots of things online [​IMG]

    Still air incubators have been used with some success for a long time. They do require stable conditions and an almost perfect set up.

    They also require ppl to accept that a 70% or lower, hatch rate, is acceptable.

    They are cheap tho. People cling on to old ideas for some reason. I get that they work, but when they were designed, better alternatives were not readily available. They are now, and are generally superior in every way.
     

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