Incubating peahen eggs?

Discussion in 'Peafowl' started by lovesanimals101, Apr 9, 2016.

  1. lovesanimals101

    lovesanimals101 Out Of The Brooder

    59
    2
    41
    Jun 19, 2015
    Are peahen eggs had to incubate? And anything different than a chicken egg besides 28 days?
     
  2. KsKingBee

    KsKingBee Overrun With Chickens

    We have about 30 in the bator right now, first ones due on the 17th.
     
  3. barkerg

    barkerg Chillin' With My Peeps

    807
    194
    141
    Jun 28, 2015
    Salado, Texas
    Pea egg hatch rates in incubators are lower than natural incubation and much lower when compared to chickens and other "easier" yard fowl we like to raise. There are many here that have almost mastered the art but most are still struggling. I am not sure why pea eggs are harder in incubators some say its the humidity and others say its a bacteria issue. I abandoned hatching pea eggs from start to finish in incubators years ago due to low hatch rates, I now foster set my eggs under gamefowl and if I start running out of hen space I will set the eggs under the hen for 12-14 days minimum and then move them over to the incubator for the finish.

    Gerald Barker
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2016
  4. lovesanimals101

    lovesanimals101 Out Of The Brooder

    59
    2
    41
    Jun 19, 2015
    Do you have any tips, is it like turkeys? Do we need to have circulating air or is still air fine? Have you hatched peahen eggs out before KsKingBee or is this your first time sorry for all the questions just want to know if hatching out has high hatch rates or if I should have a hen sit on them?
    Thanks!
     
  5. lovesanimals101

    lovesanimals101 Out Of The Brooder

    59
    2
    41
    Jun 19, 2015
    Thanks you barkerg I didn't see your reply till after I posted mine! I have one question though would muscovys hatch out peahen eggs?? I have a 2 that our laying eggs but are young duck never went broody before and I am really wanting to hatch out some peafowl but don't know what to do....incubate or have a hen sit.
     
  6. Birdrain92

    Birdrain92 Overrun With Chickens

    4,027
    544
    286
    Jun 7, 2013
    Idaho
    In my opinion it's the humidity. I believe that I will have it mastered this year hopefully.
     
  7. KsKingBee

    KsKingBee Overrun With Chickens

    Quote:I have hatched a few... IMO air circulation is important, humidity is VERY important, I started getting better results after I dropped the humidity to the low 40's. But then again, in my opinion, the most important would be nutrition and the lack of parasites and cocci. The nutrition cycle starts at molting in the fall of the year when the males are growing back their train. Remember that there are two birds creating eggs, the hen, and the cock, and both need to be in top condition or the offspring will suffer from poor hatch rates, slow growth, and high mortality.
     
  8. barkerg

    barkerg Chillin' With My Peeps

    807
    194
    141
    Jun 28, 2015
    Salado, Texas
    Muscovys will work and some breeders much larger than me uses them. I used a couple of those quackless a few years ago and they did ok but, due to the ducks disposition it was hard placing eggs under her or to candle eggs as they get to hitting you with their wings and eggs got cracked so we decided to use gamehens solely. Good luck and keep the results posted.[​IMG]

    Gerald Barker
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2016
  9. gilavette

    gilavette New Egg

    1
    0
    6
    Apr 27, 2016
    Hi, I am considering purchasing a incubator. Is there a make and model you would recommend?
     
  10. Garden Peas

    Garden Peas Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,176
    286
    208
    Sep 23, 2014
    If you are starting with a few eggs (and not a large hatching operation), you might consider the Genesis. I have done well with mine, and find it a big improvement over previous styrofoam incubators. Whatever you choose, you will probably have more success with a digital temperature control (avoid any wafer switch controller). An automatic egg turner (goose egg-sized) will increase your hatch rate -- I would avoid the ones with the floppy mesh that has to be zip-tied to the eggs, because the eggs still need to be turned over twice per day. Circulated air seems to help.

    While opinions vary, my hatch rates improved after I began disinfecting eggs before I set them -- 28 days is a very long time to breed bacteria at perfect bacteria breeding temps. Amazon carries the Brinsea incubator disinfectant, and a small bottle lasts quite awhile. I pre-mix a spray bottle with it to disinfect the incubator, and I disinfect my hands before I handle the eggs. I use it at half the labeled dilution strength to disinfect the eggs before setting them.

    Good luck!
    GP
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by