Incubating Peahen eggs

Discussion in 'Peafowl' started by the Fowler, May 21, 2016.

  1. the Fowler

    the Fowler Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 7, 2013
    I am new to peafowl. I have collected several peahen eggs and began to put them in the incubator a few at a time. My first 4 should have been hatched by yesterday and are not. (30 days) I am so disappointed.I can see there are babies in there but am not sure there is movement. I have some eye problems and so when I am candling them what I think is movement probably isn't...I'm just not sure. They are still in the bator...day 31. Any hope for them?

    I was able to keep the temp and humidity reasonably close to what it should be so I don't know what I did wrong. The humidity now at hatching time is only 61...I couldn't get it any higher plus I have eggs in there to hatch at different times.

    Then on to the next batch: I am worried that my other eggs with come to a similar problem...I don't want a bunch of dead peachicks!!! I finally got some hens (chickens) interested in being broody. Since the incubator process doesn't seem to be working should I move the eggs (second and third batch) to a hen...if so how many peafowl eggs could I put under a medium size hen?

    I am not new to using the incubator I have hatched dozens of chicken and guinea eggs successfully. I realize peahen eggs are a bit more temperamental getting a successful hatch.

    Can anyone help me with suggestions?
     
  2. Argus

    Argus Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Where are you located (climate, altitude)? Where are you getting the eggs from?
     
  3. the Fowler

    the Fowler Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 7, 2013
    I am in southern Missouri. I own the peahens that laid these eggs. Altitude 1500...I would call the climate temperate at this time of year...it's a cooler spring than usual. But of course the incubator is inside.
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2016
  4. Argus

    Argus Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Just trying to rule out problems outside the incubator first. How old are the hens and peacock(s)? Have they produced fertilized eggs before?
     
  5. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    What temp and humidity did you run at ? Still air or forced are?

    -Kathy
     
  6. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    @the Fowler , what do your air cells look like?
    [​IMG]

    -Kathy
     
  7. the Fowler

    the Fowler Out Of The Brooder

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    I ran the temp at 100 and the humidity was usually about 50. It's a still air incubator.The cell was maybe at 15.I just broke open an egg. Inside was a fully formed chick that looks maybe only just a little bit too small for hatching. I did take the next batch of 4 down to a broody hen. She took them just fine. I have 3 more batches of 4 and will candle them to make sure there is chick in them and take them to my 3 broody hens I guess. I might leave one batch in the incubator, I don't know. This is such a disappointment and I am so afraid I won't get any chicks.
     
  8. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    I think you will get better results if you run at a higher temp as 100 is too low for a still air. Can't comment on humidity 'cause I haven't figured that one out yet.

    http://www.backyardchickenelearning.com/little-giant-model-9200-still-air-incubator-review/
    "Research revealed that still air incubation temperatures should be set to 101° to 103° instead of the suggested 99.5°. The reason for the higher temperature is because the still air incubator has temperature layering because the air is not being moved by a fan."

    http://www.thepoultrysite.com/articles/166/care-and-incubation-of-hatching-eggs/
    "Maintain a still-air incubator at 102 degrees F. to compensate for the temperature layering within the incubator. Obtain the proper temperature reading by elevating the bulb of the thermometer to the same height as the top of the eggs when the eggs are laying horizontal. If the eggs are positioned in a vertical position, elevate the thermometer bulb to a point about ¼- to ½-inch below the top of the egg. The temperature is measured at the level where the embryos develop (at the top of the egg). Do not allow the thermometer's bulb to touch the eggs or incubator. Incorrect readings will result. "

    Someone here made the same mistake last season and didn't have a single one hatch.

    -Kathy
     
  9. the Fowler

    the Fowler Out Of The Brooder

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    Oh my! I did a search for temp and came up with the 99 to 100 and went with that. Poor little things. Just now turned up the heat for the remaining. Do you think the hen (chicken) will maintain a high enough heat? I just feel sick over this. But then I'm not the only one Thank you for the information!
     
  10. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Chicken, duck, or turkey, all can incubate them just fine. *many* people have done the same as you. One even did it twice even though I suggested at the start of their first set to run higher.

    -Kathy
     

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