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Incubator temperature affect the sex ratio?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Naduah, Apr 10, 2016.

  1. Naduah

    Naduah Out Of The Brooder

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    So, my last two hatches I ran my own test out of curiosity with an auto sexing breed (CCL) with temperature. I had read that lower temps produce more pullets and higher temps produce more cockerels.

    Hatch 1: had 24 eggs set at 99.5; varying highest temp of 100.1. 14 hatched, 6 infertile, 4 'dead' eggs. 12 were pullets, 2 were cockerels.

    Hatch 2: had 24 eggs set at 100.8; varying highest temp of 101.3. 12 eggs hatched, 7 were infertile, 5 'dead' eggs. 11 were cockerels, 1 was a Pullet.

    Has anyone else conducted temperature experiments to see if it affects the outcome of sex? What were your findings?
     
  2. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    But what was the sex of the DIS chicks? Were the DIS chicks in hatch one mostly cockerels and 2 mostly pullets?
     
  3. AnimalTamer

    AnimalTamer Out Of The Brooder

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    I hope its safe for me to try this! I would be better off with pullets, because I'm having them as pets that make free breakfast.
     
  4. RHBRanch

    RHBRanch Out Of The Brooder

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    I heard something about this also but never tried it out. Might have to try it out on the next batch. Has anyone ever heard about the shape of the eggs indicating the sex of the chick?
     
  5. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    Yup. You can find a few threads on that one too.
     
  6. dekel18042

    dekel18042 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The shape of the egg has been disproved but there does seem to be validity in the temperature in the incubator. It certainly doesn't change the sex of the chick but in lower temperatures seem to have no effect on pullets hatching while the cockerels will hatch better in warmer temps. So you're not changing any sex, just perhaps keeping a few of the sex you don't want from hatching.
    I've read about this in several places. Since I hatch mostly to replace pullets in my laying flock, I may try this. When I want a rooster I want only one so it wouldn't seem to have an effect on that.
     
  7. Naduah

    Naduah Out Of The Brooder

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    I heard rounder eggs are associated with cockerels, pointer eggs pullets. In my temperature experiment, most of the eggs I used were rounder so I don't think that one holds true but it would be a great experiment to try!
     
  8. trailrider330

    trailrider330 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I did try this out of curiosity with my last hatch and it produced 84% pullets. Most everyone I've talked about this method seems to think there is nothing behind it either, but I plan to try it again. It certainly can't hurt anything.
     
  9. Naduah

    Naduah Out Of The Brooder

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    I am not sure what DIS means but hatch 1 produced 12 pullets and 2 cockerels. Hatch 2 produced 11 cockerels and 1 Pullet. CCLs are auto sexing breed so can tell the sex as soon as they fluff up a few hours after hatching.
     
  10. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    Rounder is supposed to be female while pointed is male, but considering your hen lays reletively the same shape of an egg you'd have to consider (since the female determines the sex of the egg) if a hen that lays rounder eggs has a higher average of producing females and a hen that lays more pointed eggs has a higher average of producing males. There are some people and I can name one that has been playing with this theory by incubating the more rounded eggs and she has been having a higher pullet ratio.

    Personally I think it's all wishfull thinking. I've had a 100% hatch rate hatched at the higher average and the majority (for once) was pullets. Not by much though.
     

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