Indoor quail

Discussion in 'Quail' started by quailz101, Nov 14, 2014.

  1. quailz101

    quailz101 Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 14, 2014
    hi, I'm planning on raising quail inside. I Would like some information on what to do such as what kind of light they need and temperatures. I really need help since I can't have them out for long now that winters coming thanks!:)
     
  2. dc3085

    dc3085 Chillin' With My Peeps

    There is almost nowhere in the world that quail can't handle being outside. What temperatures are you seeing? Unless you're talking -20* F for weeks on end quail are just fine outside in the cold. Block the wind from them with plastic sheeting and they are good to go.
     
  3. quailz101

    quailz101 Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 14, 2014
    20's and 30's not much.
     
  4. dc3085

    dc3085 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quail can easily deal with temperatures down to 0* F throughout winter as long as you block out the wind around them.

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    Last edited: Nov 15, 2014
  5. James the Bald

    James the Bald Chillin' With My Peeps

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  6. quailz101

    quailz101 Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 14, 2014
    Thank you James
     
  7. GuineaFowling

    GuineaFowling Chillin' With My Peeps

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    *most quails can withstand the cold, not all. Button quail cannot be out in the cold. I live in Central California and had to bring my buttons in because they were freezing outside and they are kept in a covered pen.
     
  8. lcombri

    lcombri New Egg

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    I have researched for chickens to keep some smell down you use cedar or pine shavings, could you use this for quail as well?
     
  9. Tony K T

    Tony K T Overrun With Chickens

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    You should never use cedar chips for any kind of bird.
    In N.H.,Tony.
     
  10. lcombri

    lcombri New Egg

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    ok, thank you but then what about pine? pine still smells better than hay, and I've seen people use that in some of the articles as well. There are others out there who say its bad as well, but people still use it.
    "Pine shavings are just as toxic to chickens. But NO ONE ever points that out. Any aromatic softwood shaving is unhealthy for your chooks.

    There is strong scientific evidence that pine and cedar shavings are harmful to their health. Both these softwood shavings give off aromatic hydrocarbons (phenols) and acids that are toxic. The phenols, which give the shavings their scent, are the reason that cedar repels fleas and moths and why pine-oil is the major ingredient in Pine-sol brand disinfectant. In the laboratory, autoclaved pine and cedar shavings have been shown to inhibit the growth of micro-organisms. When animals are exposed to softwood shavings the aromatic hydrocarbons are absorbed through the respiratory tract and enter the blood. ..."

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/99738/who-says-cedar-is-bad-for-chickens

    If its bad for chickens would it be bad for quail as well?

    In my neighborhood we've found a loop hole, in order to have quail we have to keep them inside as pets (though my husband calls them "edible pets"), because if they're kept outside then they are considered livestock (funny thing though, they run wild in our yards) I've talked to my city and the place they referred me to (I believe it was wildlife management but I don't remember) sorry I'm just trying to figure a way to have them in the house, without smelling it up. I don't mean to sound rude or anything, just trying to educate myself on this.
     

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