infared heat light

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by gypsy5583, Nov 23, 2012.

  1. gypsy5583

    gypsy5583 Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 22, 2012
    I am new to all this, I was wondering about a white brooder lamp verses a infared heat lamp. I do not have babies, just one rooster and 4 hens. I was using the white light all night long, for heat and security, dont know if I need it or not, but I stopped because I thought it may be affecting the amount of rest they get, at least from what I ve read and everytime I would go and check on them they would be roosting but not sleeping. So I got the infared light, I am nervous about it, I know it gets hot. how close should it be to them, I have it hanging in the top of the coop. will the red light affect their sleep and can I use it all night, its starting to get cold here. I really have no idea.
     
  2. Whittni

    Whittni Overrun With Chickens

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    If you are in a cold climate you should just try to have a draft-free (no wind) coop rather than use a bulb because heat near roosting chickens can cause frostbite. Chickens are fine in the cold, especially in a group, if you live in a cold place and have chickens with big combs and waddles (red skin on top and bottom of head) you should put petroleum jelly on the exposed skin, the combs and waddles.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. debid

    debid Overrun With Chickens

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    Red light is still light and they do see it although the effect on them is supposed to be less than with white.

    Personally, I wouldn't heat chickens unless I was absolutely certain they needed it. Mine did fine last winter so I know they're good to 5 degrees as long as I can keep the water liquid.

    If you're sure you want to heat your chickens, look at how large the light circle is shining on the roost. That should help guide you on how high above them to hang it. I'd guess you would need ~3' of clearance to give them all coverage.
     
  4. gypsy5583

    gypsy5583 Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 22, 2012
    thank you all, this helps so much. What does the petroleum jelly do ?
     
  5. Whittni

    Whittni Overrun With Chickens

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    prevents the frost bite, like an extra layer of skin almost...
     
  6. debid

    debid Overrun With Chickens

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    It prevents moisture from reaching the comb. Whether your birds are at risk depends on how cold it is, how humid or dry the air is, and how large the comb is. I have single-comb hens but haven't ever needed to use anything on them because the coop is very dry and it doesn't get colder than the teens, normally.
     
  7. gypsy5583

    gypsy5583 Out Of The Brooder

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    my coop is dry, and they are out of direct wind when they roost, it doesnt get below the 20s here in va ususally but sometimes we get windchills in the teens. nothing like that yet tho, 31 overnight has been the lowest so far.
     
  8. debid

    debid Overrun With Chickens

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    Then I wouldn't bother with the Vaseline unless you start having problems. No need to make extra work for yourself and you definitely don't NEED to heat your coop in those temps.
     
  9. gypsy5583

    gypsy5583 Out Of The Brooder

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    THANKS, I was picturing having to catch them all and what kind of fight they were gonna give me to put it on them lol.
     
  10. debid

    debid Overrun With Chickens

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    That's a job I would only do by flashlight. They don't resist much when they can't see...
     

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