Infection/ feather loss on chicks neck

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by New2Chickhens, Jun 6, 2018.

  1. New2Chickhens

    New2Chickhens Hatching

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    My silkie Lola is a 5 weeks old and has a sibling Lolita. I got them from family, farm & home and noticed no issues but put them both in a brooder by themselves (they were bigger than the other chicks by a lot). Recently we got 3 small Rodies from the same place and put them in with Lola and her sister. After a short time I noticed all of the chicks were scratching near their ears and on their necks. A few days after, Lola had no feathers on the back of her neck, it is very swollen and a pink green color. I had no clue what to do so I applied some triple antibiotic ointment to the area and placed her away from the others so they wouldn't peck at her bare neck. What should I do? Could this be causes by mites/lice? Help!
    Screenshot_20180606-111854.png Screenshot_20180606-111848.png
     
  2. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Enabler

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    It could be from mites since they have been scratching a lot. Check them all really well for any crawling bugs, including ants.
    You may want to clean out all your bedding and treat your brooders and all the birds with a Permethrin based poultry spray or dust.

    The swelling is concerning, it looks like it may be getting infected, so keep the ointment on and monitor her for any pus, lethargy or bad odors. The green is probably bruising, could be from scratching, but i would also observe to see if the RIR are plucking out her feathers too.
     
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  3. Shezadandy

    Shezadandy Songster

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    You may want to consider the cone of shame to help get this little through her ordeal.

    Have a look- lots of good info in there- the "Cone of Shame" is at the bottom of this page- she shows how to make it. The object, of course, just like with a dog- is to keep them from continuing self-injury in the healing process. Growing new feathers is an itchy business.

    http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/chick-picking-causes-prevention/
     
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  4. Chilly Lizard

    Chilly Lizard Songster

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    Buffs neck feathers not returning, we originally thought she lost them because she was broody. But they have not returned for six months. We also feel like her crown is paler then it should be. Any thoughts?
     

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  5. Shezadandy

    Shezadandy Songster

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    She might not get them back until she does a full-on molt. I've got 2 hens that love picking each other's neck feathers- they look like naked necks!! Their other cohort in neck feather picking molted and they've left her alone- so depending on her age- I'm hoping they've outgrown their little habit and will regrow everything when they (finally) molt this fall.

    If you're getting the same horrible hot weather we are, the comb color change could be a response to heat stress. You might want to check her abdomen for fluid to make sure she doesn't have water belly (ascities). When the heart has to work really hard in the hot weather to try and cool her off- any issue is exacerbated. Then they start collecting fluid in the abdomen, which furthers the heart issue and makes it harder to breathe too- at a time when their heart is working really hard trying to stay cool.

    On bigger birds like Buffs, they can hide it - best way to see if they've got it (unless it's REALLY obvious) is to sit down in a chair and put her on your lap facing away from you, so her feet are sticking out- that helps all the fluid flow down if there is any.

    If that's part of her equation, here's an excellent video on draining the abdomen. The best tools are a 14 or 16 gauge 1" needle - and for some I've found I don't actually need the syringe itself- but at least a 35ml syringe that has the tip for a needle (not a "feeder" tip), preferably a 60ml- and a helper if one is available. She shows how to do it in ONE poke in an area where you don't have to worry about hitting internal organs.

     
  6. Chilly Lizard

    Chilly Lizard Songster

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    Thank you! Yes Hot, not far from you.
    We'll check her belly. We lost our Rhode Island Red this am, I think she was further along with the same issue.
     
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  7. Shezadandy

    Shezadandy Songster

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    I'm so sorry. We lost one of our buff hens this week too- but the other 2 bounced back after getting drained. I do bring those in at night when it's hot- and anyone else struggling in the nest box or at night in the coop - usually it's the same group - At least they can settle in a cool place and recover overnight before the next hot day. Last year we lost a 1 year old overnight during one of these things even with fans blowing, then after basically turning my basement bathroom into a chicken coop, carrying everyone in and out... I put in a poultry exhaust fan- and it's been a lot better because it changes the temperature in the coop as fast as it does outside. They've been more comfortable and fewer have needed in. It doesn't take much to take a minor issue into a life threatening one in this heat. =(
     
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  8. Shezadandy

    Shezadandy Songster

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    If you don't have any needles on hand, Wilco or Coastal should have them in the cattle health section- I think the biggest one they carry is a 16 gauge if that ends up being part of the problem.
     
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  9. Chilly Lizard

    Chilly Lizard Songster

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    I forgot to say thank you! I really appreciate you taking the time to respond.
     

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