Info on that BIG chicken rescue???

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by darbella, Dec 15, 2009.

  1. darbella

    darbella Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 2, 2008
    New Hampshire
    Does anyone have any onformation as to the 16,000 laying hens that they were looking to find homes for? I have a friend that purchased sheds for myself and another friend so we could adopt some of these hens and now we have heard they will not be released until May!! Any ideas or word as to why they needed homes and also why they will not be released till May???
     
  2. Zahboo

    Zahboo Simply Stated

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    Do you have an internet link or other information?
     
  3. DuckLady

    DuckLady ~~~Administrator~~~BYC Store Support Staff Member

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    Contact Jennifer at Carolina Waterfowl Rescue.
    [email protected]

    She may know something as she was helping with the placement of the hens.
     
  4. Mac in Wisco

    Mac in Wisco Antagonist

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    I did some searching on Google and saw the announcement several places, but without many details. It sounds like somebody is giving away an organic flock at the end of their production. Either they can't find a cull market for the hens and are trying to avoid disposal costs (disposing of 32 tons of birds is no small feat), or somebody has paid the farm for the spent flock so they can be "rescued" by giving them away to people who want to continue to raise them.

    16,000 hens eat 2 tons a day. If they are not releasing the birds to the public until January (or May?) these birds must still be in production and will be offered up when they have finished serving their purpose.

    I've posted my thoughts on this before and I'll post them again. 100's of millions of layer hens are raised, and 100's of millions are culled every year in the U.S. In my opinion these birds are rescued when they are dispatched. If you want them for your own peace of mind, or as a cheap source of layer hens, then so be it, but to call it a "rescue" is stretching it a bit. You are only extending the birds' lives to place them into service for yourself.

    I have a large organic flock that will go to cull after a year of production to be replaced by a new flock. I would have no problem giving a few birds to people who wanted them rather than sending them to the processor. I would have a problem with somebody showing up thinking that they need to "rescue" them. These birds are livestock, I treat them as well as I can, but they are raised for a specific purpose...
     
  5. theOEGBman

    theOEGBman Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:YESSSSSSS! This post is amazing! They're well cared for, but they're for a purpose, they're not your dog. Great post.
     
  6. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    I agree.... WHEN they are livestock AND well cared for then the word "rescue" should not be used as it implies that there is something wrong.
     
  7. Zahboo

    Zahboo Simply Stated

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    Ohhhh I gathered that they were like the puppy mill of the chicken world, expecting overcrowding and harsh conditions, not just layers that are past their prime. I kinda agree with the OEGB man, but since my birds are pets I kinda don't, of course these girlies weren't raised as pets.
     
  8. theOEGBman

    theOEGBman Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Oh I definitely think of my chickens as pets. They're going to stay here until they die of natural causes. But in a commercial stand point, they are a business, not pets. That's what I was referring to. : )
     
  9. Zahboo

    Zahboo Simply Stated

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    Quote:Oh I definitely think of my chickens as pets. They're going to stay here until they die of natural causes. But in a commercial stand point, they are a business, not pets. That's what I was referring to. : )

    That's what I meant. If they were raised in a cruel enviornment but were intended as pets, I'd see it as rescuing, but just a way for commercial industries to limit the cost of culling, I don't have that much room. I don't know what it makes a difference to me, a life is a life, I guess it's just they were bred to lay and one day the lights are off for them... Mine are used to a gigantor run and crickets on holidays...
     
  10. Mac in Wisco

    Mac in Wisco Antagonist

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    Quote:But even if they are being raised in less than humane standards are you really rescuing them by taking them in at the end of their production period? You are only rescuing them from slaughter and then putting them to use for your own purposes, albeit it in better conditions. Whether you get them free or pay a small price, the producer needs to get rid of hens at the end of the production cycle to stay profitable. By taking in hens from substandard operations you are only helping the producer move out his old flock so he can move in a new one and start the cycle again.

    Can a person really make it up to a bird for another's mistreatment? "Sorry about that ol' gal. Here's a nice coop and some straw for you. Now how about laying a few more eggs for me?"
     

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