Info on the chocolate wyandotte genetics

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by call ducks, Jan 24, 2010.

  1. call ducks

    call ducks silver appleyard addict

    4,260
    46
    253
    Mar 4, 2009
    waterville , canada
    i would like to know more about the chocolate wyandotte genetics.
     
  2. WyandotteTX

    WyandotteTX Chillin' With My Peeps

    964
    19
    151
    Jan 10, 2010
    They work the same as Blue genetics in other breeds of chickens. When you cross a Dun(Chocolate) against another Dun you will get 50% Dun, 25% Black and another 25% Khaki(Lilac as its been called also). If you cross Dun x Black you will get 50/50 of those two colors. If you cross Dun x Khaki you will get 50/50 of those two colors. If you cross a Black x Khaki you will get 100% Dun.
    It is a beautiful color for sure. Us Wyandotte lovers have many thanks to Dr Edgar Petty for creating this breed over many, many years of hard work. I have an article he wrote about how he went about creating it. I talked to Dr Petty several times on the phone and also had many correspondences with him about wyandottes , such an interesting and intelligent man.
     
  3. flyingmonkeypoop

    flyingmonkeypoop Overrun With Chickens

    3,592
    119
    268
    Apr 30, 2007
    Deer Park Washington
    I am pretty sure the chocolate wyandottes in the UK are the real sexlinked chocolate, I heard that they dont really have dun over there.
     
  4. blackdotte

    blackdotte Chillin' With My Peeps

    786
    12
    131
    Nov 18, 2008
    Do you want information on the Dun ,an allele of Dominant White, as described in the previous post, OR information on the Sex-linked Recessive Chocolate gene?Chocolate Wyandottes in the US are Dun birds, Chocolate Wyandottes in the UK are Sex-linked Recessive Chocolate.
    David
     
  5. call ducks

    call ducks silver appleyard addict

    4,260
    46
    253
    Mar 4, 2009
    waterville , canada
    Quote:Yes , i would like some info on Dun
     
  6. call ducks

    call ducks silver appleyard addict

    4,260
    46
    253
    Mar 4, 2009
    waterville , canada
    Quote:Thanks , for the info
     
  7. call ducks

    call ducks silver appleyard addict

    4,260
    46
    253
    Mar 4, 2009
    waterville , canada
    Also , how did the Dun (colour ? ) show up ? is it a dilutcion of black ?
     
  8. WyandotteTX

    WyandotteTX Chillin' With My Peeps

    964
    19
    151
    Jan 10, 2010
    Found the article written by Dr Petty. Dont have a scanner to put it on so will have to do it the old fashioned way and type it out for everyone to read.
    Give me a little while and I will get it posted on here.
     
  9. call ducks

    call ducks silver appleyard addict

    4,260
    46
    253
    Mar 4, 2009
    waterville , canada
    Quote:Thanks, it will have info that all of us will find usefull
     
  10. WyandotteTX

    WyandotteTX Chillin' With My Peeps

    964
    19
    151
    Jan 10, 2010
    This is an article published in a book called The Rare Varieties Report. It was put together by the now non-existant Wyandotte Bantam Club and printed in 1994.
    The article was written by Dr Edgar Petty the originator of the Dun Wyandotte Bantam in the US.


    I have been interested in Wyandotte Bantams since 1947, when my father and I began raising White Wyandotte Bantams. It was those early years with Wyandotte Bantams that taught me what to look for in Wyandotte type, head, tail angle and open inverted V in the tail: a bird of curves no matter the view of the bird. Over the years I have raised many varieties of Wyandotte Bantams and enjoyed each variety for its unique breeding challenge.
    It was in 1985 while corresponding with a friend, Dr Willard Hollander, a retired professor of genetics in Ames, Iowa. He now has projects in genetics going with poultry and pigeons. He knew I was interested in all his projects, so he shared many things with me in his letters. One letter particularly interested me for he stated a new color had been identified. He referred to the color as Dun, because it appeared to be the color of the dun colored pigeon, a brown or metallic brown as it has a green sheen much like in the Black Wyandotte male. In latter letters I learned more about the genetic makeup of Dun. Dr Hollander willingly shared a hen with me carrying the dun color. She was large for a bantam; however showed Japanese in breeding as she was a creeper(short legged). She was Wheaton pattern with all black areas such as tail, wing and hackle feathers being Dun(brown). The comb on this hen was modified pea comb. She was a good layer of brown eggs. A most interesting bird for her genetic background.
    Before discussing the mating of this hen for the first generation of the Dun Wyandotte project, let me give you some ideas about this color by answering two questions. What is the color dun and how is dun related to other colors in poultry? The color dun is best described as a metallic brown, some call it chocolate. Metallic brown is what I call it as the self colored male has the green sheen as in Black, only it is a softer sheen than in Black. Dun is related to dominate white(I) which is an inhibitor of black. this means at this time dun is viewed as an inhibitor of Black. If a bantam is dark dun it has one gene for dun which causes the black pigment to reduced(inhibited) reflecting the color brown instead of black. If a bantam is light dun it has two genes for dun which causes further reduction(inhibiting) of the black color, so it appears pastel brown(a light brown). In my project the two gene birds are almost white, but show dun in bill and leg color. In other bantams the light dun is a soft pastel brown. Dun is not the same color as blue, as blue is more gray or slate gray in color.
    In 1986 I began the Dun Wyandotte project by mating a Black Wyandotte Bantam cockerel with the hen I received from Dr. Hollander. This cockerel was selected for his type, head and yellow leg color, but he was larger than desired for a true bantam to permit proper mating with the large hen. he was from laced breeding with no lacing showing. He has gold in genetic background, so he showed rich green sheen. From this mating I hatched over 35 chicks, 18 black chicks and 17 dun chicks. If the chick down was not dun the bird was not dun and was discarded from the project. All 17 dun chicks were raised to maturity. There were more females than males, so, in 1987 three self dun pullets were selected to mate to a small Black Wyandotte cock bird. All of these pullets had cushion(walnut) combs(the interaction of rose and pea combs). All had normal leg length and leg color was dusty dun. There were a number of birds showing Columbian pattern and lacing in the dun and these were shared with Jonnie Blaines of Hutchinson, Kansas to mate with Silver Laced for Dun Laced Wyandottes.
    In 1987 mating of these three dun pullets to the Black cock bird produced 75 chicks with 35 Dun and 40 black chicks(note: 50% dun and 50% black is to be expected in black x dark dun mating). Most birds had the cushion comb and were larger than desired for Wyandotte bantams. The bills and legs were dusky dun. Two cockerels and six pullets were selected from the 35 mature dun birds. These birds, while Wyandotte type, had cushion combs and dusky dun in the bills and legs.
    In 1988 I mated two pens of dun. A small black cock bird was mated to three of the dun pullets and one of the dun cockerels was mated to two Black Wyandotte pullets. The hatches this year was not as "good" as in past years, so only produced about 60 birds, 33 duns and 27 blacks. Again only the dun were saved. This year produced a few rosecomb chicks. However, most were still cushion comb birds. Size and body type were improved this year. During the project the brown egg color was maintained and the red earlobes. Selected three cockerels and seven pullets for next mating, one cockerel was rosecomb and two cushion combed. Two pullets had rosecombs and five cushion combs.
    In 1989 I mated two pens of Dun. (Pen 1) The rosecomb dun cockerel mated to three dun pullets. This mating, a cross between the two pens of 1988. (Pen 2) A cushion comb dun cockerel mated to three dun pullets including two rosecomb pullets. This years hatch was 85 plus 25% black chicks and 75% dun chicks. The dun chicks were of two colors; homozygous dun(light dun) almost white with dun in bill and legs most of these were pullets and other heterozygous dun (dark dun) was both pullets and cockerels. All birds were small enough to be called Wyandotte bantams. A larger number had rosecombs with definite spikes(leaders). All male birds had yellow legs and five the females had yellow legs, bodies on some birds longer than desired. Selected from these matings two cockerels, dark dun, five pullets, light dun.
    In 1990 I mated two pens of dun (Pen 1) an excellent black cockerel mated to five light dun pullets. (Pen 2) Best Dark Dun cockerel to four black females (2 hens, 2 pullets). These two pens so far this spring(1991) have produced 90 plus chicks. Pen 1 has produced 100% dun with fine type and dark dun color. Pen 2 had produced 50% dun and 50% black with improved type and dark dun color. These birds are at various stages of development. Until they reach maturity selection will not be made.
    I am beginning projects in Dun Laced and Dun Partridge. Both of these patterns are attractive when black is reduced to brown(Dun).




    Hope everyone enjoys this post about the creation of Dun Wyandotte bantams. If there are any typos I apologize, I tried to type it verbatim of what is printed.
    There is another article about the Dun Partridge and the creation of White Crested Dun Polish bantams also.
     
    1 person likes this.

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by