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Information on coccidiosis

Discussion in 'Peafowl' started by Trefoil, Jul 29, 2014.

  1. Trefoil

    Trefoil Songster

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    Below chart was copied from mercks site.In case the site becomes unavailable, I copied some of the info.
    http://www.merckmanuals.com/vet/poultry/coccidiosis/overview_of_coccidiosis_in_poultry.html#v3340164

    Drugs for Treatment of Coccidiosis in Chickens a
    Drug

    Feed or Water

    Use Level, Treatment Duration

    Withdrawal Time (days)
    Amprolium

    Water

    0.012%–0.024%, 3–5 days; 0.006%, 1–2 wk

    0
    Chlortetracycline

    Feed

    0.022% + 0.8% calcium, not more than 3 wk

    0
    Oxytetracycline

    Feed

    0.022% + 0.18%–0.55% calcium, not more than 5 days

    3
    Sodium sulfachloropyrazine monohydrate

    Water

    0.03%, 3 days

    4
    Sulfadimethoxine

    Water

    0.05%, 6 days

    5
    Sulfamethazine (sulfadimidine)

    Water

    0.1%, 2 days; 0.05%, 4 days

    10
    Toltrazuril

    Water

    25 ppm, 2 days

    NAb
    a Approved in the USA, except for toltrazuril
    b Not applicable
    Anticoccidials are given in the feed to prevent disease and the economic loss often associated with subacute infection. Prophylactic use is preferred, because most of the damage occurs before signs become apparent and because drugs cannot completely stop an outbreak. Therapeutic treatments are usually given by water because of the logistical restraints of feed administration. Antibiotics and increased levels of vitamins A and K are sometimes used in the ration to improve rate of recovery and prevent secondary infections.
    Continuous use of anticoccidial drugs promotes the emergence of drug-resistant strains of coccidia. Various programs are used in attempts to slow or stop selection of resistance. For instance, producers may use one anticoccidial continuously through succeeding flocks, change to alternative anticoccidials every 4–6 mo, or change anticoccidials during a single growout (ie, a shuttle program). While there is little cross-resistance to anticoccidials with different modes of action, there is widespread resistance to most drugs. Coccidia can be tested in the laboratory to determine which products are most effective. “Shuttle programs,” in which one group of chickens is treated sequentially with different drugs (usually a change between the starter and grower rations), are common practice and offer some benefit in slowing the emergence of resistance. In the USA, the FDA considers shuttle programs as extra-label usage, but producers may use such programs on the recommendation of a veterinarian
     
  2. casportpony

    casportpony Go Team Tube Feeding! Premium Member Project Manager 6 Years

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    Quote:
    Below are the amounts needed to make water medicated with amprolium per the text in bold above:

    The .006% dose for Corid or Amprol Powder is 1/3 teaspoon per gallon.
    The .006% dose for Corid or Amprol liquid is 1/2 teaspoon per gallon.

    The .012% dose for Corid or Amprol Powder is 3/4 teaspoon per gallon.
    The .012% dose for Corid or Amprol liquid is 1 teaspoon per gallon.

    The .024% dose for Corid or Amprol Powder is 1.5 teaspoons per gallon.
    The .024% dose for Corid or Amprol liquid is 2 teaspoon per gallon.

    -Kathy
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2014
  3. casportpony

    casportpony Go Team Tube Feeding! Premium Member Project Manager 6 Years

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    1 person likes this.
  4. casportpony

    casportpony Go Team Tube Feeding! Premium Member Project Manager 6 Years

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    Sulfadimethoxine is sold as Albon and Dimethox and comes in many strengths.

    -Kathy
     

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