Ingredients in Poultry Spice

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by rbbaker, Dec 18, 2008.

  1. rbbaker

    rbbaker New Egg

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    Does anyone know of a source for "Poultry Spice" (or a comparable supplement) in the U.S. ? Or can someone in the UK provide a list of ingredients?

    Many thanks
     
  2. HennysMom

    HennysMom Keeper of the Tiara

    black pepper, coriander, sage, salt..

    I dont know what else, I'm looking at my bottle and thats all it says on it.

    Anyone else?
     
  3. rbbaker

    rbbaker New Egg

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    Thanks, HennysMom for the quick reply. I think I should have explained a little bit more, though. I'm trying to find out about a mineral supplement called Poultry Spice used in the UK during winter/moulting. I can't seem to find out whether it or something like it is available in the U.S.
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2008
  4. Highlander

    Highlander Tartan Terror

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    Minerals, Micronised Wheat, Powdered Ginger, Turmeric, Fenugreek and Aniseed.

    Protein 5%, Oils and Fats 2%, Fibre 1%, Ash 66%, Calcium 24%, Iron 1.25%, Potassium 0.85% and Magnesium 0.3%.
     
  5. rbbaker

    rbbaker New Egg

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    Thanks, Outtathebag!!! These spices sound really warming and sure to be appreciated by the girls in the cold weather; and I have all of these on hand.
     
  6. illinichick

    illinichick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I found this exchange very funny. Poor Hennysmom, Dont worry, I was thinking the same thing. I guess in different parts of the world Poultry Spice means different things.
     
  7. cherig22

    cherig22 Green Fields Farm

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    [​IMG] Me too, I love sage for chicken, but to eat......

    Cheri
     
  8. Village Farm

    Village Farm Out Of The Brooder

    Quote:There is no such thing as a "warming" spice, if by that you mean one that actually increases heat production. If it causes a sensation of warmth by dilating skin capillaries, it will actually decrease body temperature by hastening heat loss.
     

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