Injured/Disabled Chicken

RedRoostChickens

In the Brooder
Apr 29, 2020
31
37
44
Could you hold her up to clearly see her legs and their normal position straight on while someone takes a picture? There are several leg bone deformities such as varus or valgus deformity, twisted tibia, and tibial dyschondroplasia. Slipped tendons are also possible at birth. Here are some links to read and pictures of the problems above:
https://thepoultrysite.com/articles/leg-health-in-large-broilers

https://www.researchgate.net/public..._of_the_Intertarsal_Joint_in_Broiler_Chickens

https://www.merckvetmanual.com/en-c...ctious-skeletal-disorders-in-poultry-broilers


Here's the pictures of her legs!
On the first one, her bad leg is closest to the camera and she is trying to stand on her own. In the second one, her bad leg is farthest and she is in her chair.
Thank you for all the help!
 

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RedRoostChickens

In the Brooder
Apr 29, 2020
31
37
44
We believe that she is a Welsummer, and her spurs are way longer that the other Welsummers in my flock. She doesn't like me touching her right leg and gets mad and seems to be in pain when I touch her joints.She doesn't have bumblefoot, or at least I haven't seen any on her feet, and I'm not sure about mites, but I don't think she does.

Also, it is possible that she could be something else, because she is built differently than our other Welsummers. She came from a hatchery that doesn't tell the breeds, so we really aren't sure, and she's never laid an egg.
 

RooandherRooster

Songster
Jul 25, 2019
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Also, it is possible that she could be something else, because she is built differently than our other Welsummers. She came from a hatchery that doesn't tell the breeds, so we really aren't sure, and she's never laid an egg.
I had a hen that grew spurs the older she got, it caused her to limp and have leg pain. Sometimes she would be lethargic and would get egg bound here and there even with free access to oyster shell. There's always the possibility of the breed not being correct, but if she hasn't laid an egg and are growing spurs, could she be a he?
I've heard of where the dominant hen can change into a roo almost. Like they have boy and girl organs and they can switch if there isn't a rooster or something.
Does it feel warmer near her joints than other places, especially compared to her good leg? Extra warmth could indicate an injury and you can kinda compare her bad leg to her good one to get an idea,
 

Eggcessive

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A picture of the entire body from the side might reveal breed and sex. The kind of picture that would be helpful to diagnose leg health is one from the front or back showing the legs in normal position. These pics below show some of the leg deformities. Some affect one leg, some both, one type has a knock-kneed appearance, while one has a bowlegged appearance.
1588338500680.jpeg

This one shows valgus deformity of the right leg:
1588338671838.jpeg
 

RedRoostChickens

In the Brooder
Apr 29, 2020
31
37
44
I had a hen that grew spurs the older she got, it caused her to limp and have leg pain. Sometimes she would be lethargic and would get egg bound here and there even with free access to oyster shell. There's always the possibility of the breed not being correct, but if she hasn't laid an egg and are growing spurs, could she be a he?
I've heard of where the dominant hen can change into a roo almost. Like they have boy and girl organs and they can switch if there isn't a rooster or something.
Does it feel warmer near her joints than other places, especially compared to her good leg? Extra warmth could indicate an injury and you can kinda compare her bad leg to her good one to get an idea,

Both of her legs are warm, but that might be because she was laying on them all night, so I can check again later.
I've never heard about the hen becoming a roo. We don't have a roo, so maybe it's possible.... She doesn't have a big comb or wattles, or pointy saddle feathers, though. She does have a unique voice, like a call that none of my other chickens do, but I wouldn't call it a crow. Another thing about her is her waddles grew in way faster than the other Welsummers, although I'm not even sure she's a Welsummer.
 

RedRoostChickens

In the Brooder
Apr 29, 2020
31
37
44
A picture of the entire body from the side might reveal breed and sex. The kind of picture that would be helpful to diagnose leg health is one from the front or back showing the legs in normal position. These pics below show some of the leg deformities. Some affect one leg, some both, one type has a knock-kneed appearance, while one has a bowlegged appearance.
View attachment 2117110
This one shows valgus deformity of the right leg:
View attachment 2117113


Thank you for the pictures! I will get a side view picture as soon as I can. The valgus deformity is sort of similar to what her leg looks like, only hers is less severe. Here's the best picture I could get of her! Her bad leg is closest to the camera and she's using her toes to balance.
 

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