Injured Duckling: HELP!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by macbendigo, Dec 18, 2017.

  1. macbendigo

    macbendigo In the Brooder

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    Dec 18, 2017
    Right beside the ice rink, that my brother goes to, is a pond. Recently, a duck there produced some ducklings. I did some research and am pretty sure it is a Muscovy. Here's a picture:
    IMG_1492.JPG
    As they started to grow older, we noticed that one was much smaller than the others. Upon closer inspection, we saw that something was wrong with its beak.
    IMG_1494.JPG
    Now, I also found out that they are an invasive species here in Florida. I live in the Tampa area. What should I do? I have a great love for animals; I am currently going to school to become a veterinary technician. I feel terribly sorry for this guy. It's hard for me to just sit back and not do anything, but I also want to make sure I am doing the right thing. I do not know much about this species.
    Should I call a rehabilitation place?
    Should I take it home? If I did, what would that entail?
    Should I just let nature take its course?
    Is the beak fixable? Should I just leave it be, and check up on it when I can?
    Here are some more pictures for greater context:
    IMG_1495.PNG IMG_E1496.JPG IMG_1497.PNG
     
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  2. Bridger Davis

    Bridger Davis Songster

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  3. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Free Ranging Premium Member

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    Unfortunately, this duckling needs to have special care to survive. It is probably stunted in growth due to it’s cross beak problem. That is caused by a mineral deficiency in the parents. Poultry with that problem may be able to eat better with watery feed placed in a tall bowl. That is how chicken owners usually help them eat better. If it continues like it is, it may not survive, since this beak problem can worsen with age.
     
  4. Stayc

    Stayc Crowing

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    Awww poor baby
     
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  5. Hmm?...Someone needs to be called...Either put down or rehab? Won't make it...Its a genetic disorder...
     
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  6. Ravynscroft

    Ravynscroft For the Love of Duck Premium Member

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    Awww!!! :love

    You are correct, most rehabs won't even take in Muscovy ducklings in Florida... if they do, it is usually to euthanize them humanely...

    No, that is not correctable and odds are against him living in the wild... options are either to let nature take its course or adopt it yourself or see if a friend can adopt it...

    I adopted a Call duckling with very similar bill deformation... he needed very little extra care actually and has grown into a very happy, healthy little drake!
     
  7. Pyxis

    Pyxis Hatchi Wan Kenobi Premium Member

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    I'm glad this little guy has someone that cares about him :) Since he's technically an invasive species, a wildlife rehabber probably isn't going to take him. The good news though is that it's totally legal to take him in.

    He will need special care, but he could live a good life with it. While his beak can't be fixed, he may be able to eat out of a deep dish of feed, or if it comes to it he could be tube fed if you're up to such a thing.

    If you decide to take him in, I recommend taking a sibling as well, since they really do need companionship. Then you'd need to eventually build them a coop or find them a home with someone who is willing to take them on and adequately care for him with his special needs.
     

  8. What is this tube feeding you keep pushing ?...So unessasary and if not done right the Bird will asperiate ..? My opinion is a vet or rehab that will either help or Cull the Bird..Not everything survives...
     
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  9. Ravynscroft

    Ravynscroft For the Love of Duck Premium Member

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    Tube feeding is much easier than it sounds as well... and it eliminates the worry of aspiration as the tube bypasses the trachea very easily and naturally...

    More chance of aspiration from giving liquids by a medicine dropper, just fyi...
     
  10. Pyxis

    Pyxis Hatchi Wan Kenobi Premium Member

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    Yep! I've been tube feeding ever since my vet had me do it for an injured drake a couple years ago. He recommended it for him to help him after a predator attack. When done right there is no risk of aspiration as long as you don't overfill the crop. I've got a little house chicken now that wouldn't be alive had I not tube fed her when she was sick, and a peacock too.

    I've also saved the life of a newly hatched chick that arrived in an order from a hatchery that wasn't doing well and wouldn't eat or drink. I tube fed it a little water and nutri drench and within an hour it was up and eating and drinking and has done very well.

    There are lots of people who keep cross-beak chickens like this little duckling and they tube feed them daily. There's actually an article about that here.
     

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