Injured emu

Dragonflyz01

Hatching
Feb 17, 2020
1
0
3
Hi everyone, I’ll try to keep this short. I recently moved to my grandparents ranch in Northern California. A few years ago an emu wandered onto the property and they never could find the owner, so they placed it in a large pasture with a horse and mini donkey. They have been an adorable group or friends. As far as we know and can tell the emu has been happy and comfortable and well fed. This morning however we were shocked to see that the right side of its face is nearly gone. We can only assume that a coyote or something else attacked it. It is still walking and trying to peck the ground, but I don’t see any way for it to survive, as it’s lower jaw/beak is hanging on the right side with a large hole, as you can see into its mouth area. I am really not sure what I’m asking for, except maybe any suggestions on how we can help it, or places that might be willing to give aid to rescue the poor thing...or if we should just let nature take its course. I hate this so much! Unfortunately my grandparents and myself are not in a position to spend much, even if it was possible to repair the damage with surgery. Any thoughts? I’ll try to attach a photo, but please be aware that it’s graphic.
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Friendly_Lurker

Songster
Jan 27, 2020
710
2,429
163
Kansas City Kansas
I’m so sorry! I love emus. I know it’s more difficult with a bigger bird, but maybe you could take him inside and try to clean him up. Use hydrogen peroxide and don’t get it in his eyes. Google large bird vets, too.
 

SnapdragonQ

Songster
Feb 2, 2020
369
2,027
153
VA
Oh dear...poor thing. I don't have any info for whom to contact out there as I'm on the eastern side of the US, but I do know UCDavis is often a good resource. Try googling them.
You might try contacting your local extension office also to see if there is a local organization that can help. Also, call the local humane society or shelter because they often have information on who can help with what species of animals, and some places keep lists of breed or species rescue.

If nothing pans out then you might have to consider a quicker end for the bird. Letting nature take it's course could take some time and will be very painful for this bird. Based on the pic it looks like the fellow won't be able to eat or drink even if infection doesn't set in soon. The picture isn't clear and I'm guessing you can't get very close so it's hard to say.
Do you know a hunter or someone good with a rifle? If things are as bad as the pic suggests and you have no other choice, a quick end might be kinder.
 
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