Injured eye covered in puss

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Matieus27, Dec 12, 2018.

  1. Matieus27

    Matieus27 Songster

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    I have a baby chick that hatched 2 weeks ago as of tomorrow when it hatched I noticed it had scissor beak and an eye that looked to be pushed out of its socket well I let it be and I noticed this afternoon when I was leaving for work that it is covered in puss I plan on making some saline tomorrow and rinsing the bad eye. But is there anything else I should put on it and is this going to be a rest of the chickens life maintenance . Should I just cull the chicken before anybody gets attached to it. Cause at this point the chicken is and has been blind in this eye since hatch.
     
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  2. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Enabler

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    Do you have photos?
    Is the pus because the eye is "dead" and has become infected?

    What would be your goal of keeping the chick? Pet?
     
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  3. Matieus27

    Matieus27 Songster

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    I initially got hatched for breeding purposes but with its defects there is no reason to keep it in my opinion but if it turned out to be a hen it could still lay eggs and I can get photos
     
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  4. Matieus27

    Matieus27 Songster

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    B2F39FFA-2EF6-4B6E-8DAA-511B25F39B4B.jpeg 184F3614-54BF-4141-AF6F-BBF04008BB98.jpeg B2F39FFA-2EF6-4B6E-8DAA-511B25F39B4B.jpeg There are some up close pictures
     
  5. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Enabler

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    Well, that's up to you to decide whether you want to continue to care for and feed the chick and whether it may be a productive member of your flock even if it's not in a breeding role. It does have a few things against it - the cross beak may continue to get worse, the eye is blind(?), but some people do baby a chick like this along and they thrive despite deformities. Other chicks even with best efforts fail. It's all up to you whether you want to try or not or if s/he fits into your plans - only you can make that choice.

    Eye care would be to flush with saline and apply something like Terramycin eye ointment.
    Watch to see that the chick is able to eat well and is growing. Wet feed is sometimes easier to eat. As they grow, a deeper dish where they can "scoop" feed can help as well.
     
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  6. Matieus27

    Matieus27 Songster

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    Ok so I talked with my wife and we came to the decision the chick should be culled but the dilemma is how do I humanely cull a baby chick
     
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  7. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Enabler

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    Hope this offends no one, for a chick that small, I cut the head off.
    Some people use kitchen shears or pruning shears. Not something any of us like to talk about, but it's something that likely all of us will face if you hatch or raise chicks.

    If you absolutely can't do that, there are other "methods" like vinegar + baking soda or using starter fluid. You can look those up, but for me, I don't want to try to mix up something, worry if I did it right and wait for a chick in a closed container to breath it's last breath. Taking the head off you have no doubt.
     
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  8. Matieus27

    Matieus27 Songster

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    Baking soda and vinegar seems like a slow greuling end so I opted for quick although I didn’t have kitchen shears I do have a plethora of razor sharp knives it was quick and painless and at least I know now it isn’t suffering or will it starve to death later in life because of a bad beak. The thing that really irks me is I bought the eggs off of eBay how can someone sell eggs from a line that has such deformities it’s a death sentence for those chicks that are hatched
     
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  9. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Enabler

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    :hugs I'm sorry.
    It's hard, but to me, that is the quickest way to do it.

    I'm sorry you are having trouble. Cross beak can be genetic due to genetic, incubation difficulties, parent stock nutrition, etc. If you purchased the eggs for hatching, you may at least want to contact the breeder and let them know of deformities that you have encountered. It could be they do not know. Not every deformity will show up in each generation. I'm not a breeder, but sometimes things "show up" way on down the line.
     
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  10. Matieus27

    Matieus27 Songster

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    While I can understand as I do breed rabbits and I had one deformity pop up in my line that I’ve never seen again even with the same pair breeding so I guess it could be one of those one in a million pair ups I guess I’m just aggravated that out of a dozen eggs from the same batch 3 were fertile one died before it pipped the aircell and two hatched one in perfect condition aside from a crooked toe and the other I just had to dispatch due to serious or what could have turned out to be serious deformities if it was let to live
     
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