Insulating a Coop

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Chyatt24, Aug 4, 2014.

  1. Chyatt24

    Chyatt24 Out Of The Brooder

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    We're in the process of getting 3 baby chicks, and since we live in Maine, the winters are very cold. What do you all do to insulate your coops and keep the chickens warm? Are there certain types of coops that work best?
     
  2. iwiw60

    iwiw60 Overrun With Chickens

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  3. Chyatt24

    Chyatt24 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you!!
     
  4. thomasboyle

    thomasboyle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My coop is in a shed, and it is insulated. I find the shed stays 10-15 degrees warmer than the outside air. So while it gets down to 15 many nights in the winter, the inside of the coop rarely drops below 30. Each chicken is equal to 5-10 watts of heat, so a dozen birds are equal to a 100 watt heat lamp. So insulation can make a difference. Just make sure you have adequate ventilation. I have two normal size windows that I open and close to control the moisture inside. One window is always open 50%, and I use the opposite window to add more ventilation if needed.
     
  5. vehve

    vehve The Token Finn

    Chickens will probably do fine without insulation, but insulation will help stabilize the temperature when there are big swings. It also cuts down on the noise that can be heard from a coop (great if you have a rooster and neighbors, they won't be woken by his crowing until you let him out).

    Ventilation is important to remember though. Wet air needs to come out of the coop.
     
  6. ECBW

    ECBW Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Insulate and heat the coop so the keepers can feel better. Just make sure good venting is not compromised.
     
  7. JackE

    JackE Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have an uninsulated, unheated, open-air coop. The whole front wall is open year round, covered only by hardware cloth. I can get temps into the low single digits in the winter around here. I have found that the temp in the coop is usually 10F or so higher than the outside. My birds have never had any problems with frostbite. There really is no need for insulation in a chicken coop, after all, chickens already come with perfect insulation of their own, and don't need any help from us.
     
  8. Chyatt24

    Chyatt24 Out Of The Brooder

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    Are there certain things that can be done to prevent frostbite? Thanks
     
  9. JackE

    JackE Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Make sure you have a well ventilated coop. Do not shut them up in a closed box, in some misguide attempt to keep them warm. Chickens generate mass quantities of moisture, just from breathing. The coop has to have plenty of ventilation/fresh air flow to remove it. Other than that, unless you have some kind of thinly feathered exotic breed, they are built to handle the cold. With a body temp averaging 105-6F, perfect insulation from the cold with their feathers, they are ready to go. I have some (5) BRs, with some big combs, and I have never done anything special in the winter, to prevent frostbite, and they have never had any problems. I have read here though, on the forum, that some people put vasoline on their birds combs, and wattles to prevent it. I would think that would end up being a mess, and a hassle.
     
  10. Chyatt24

    Chyatt24 Out Of The Brooder

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    I'd heard about the vaseline trick too, but I also heard that it really didn't do much. Thank you
     

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