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Insulation in NY?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by llaaadyel, May 11, 2011.

  1. llaaadyel

    llaaadyel Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 12, 2010
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    Hi: I live in Lower NY and am in the middle of building a coop and run for the chickens. My coop will be 8'by8'by9'high. My question is whether or not I should insulate the walls against cold winters. I do plan on adding electricity to the coop for heat lamps. In my area the winters are mostly around the freezing point but we do have a week or so where the weather can be below zero.

    Thanks
    E
     
  2. Yes insulate. It will keep them at a more regulated temp at night even if it doesn't get "that" cold. Freezing is still cold and although chickens can take it, it is better for them to be warm.

    Also the insulation will help during your summer months also.
     
  3. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Ontario, Canada
    If you really intend to use electric heat, IMO it would be stupid *not* to insulate, as insulation will not only keep your electric bill down but also (arguably more importantly) allow you to use lower wattage and thus SAFER heat. From what you've described of your temps though (not sure exactly where "lower NY" means -- outside NYC? lower tier, although that should be colder?) it is not at all clear to me that you'd NEED to heat if your coop is designed and managed sensibly.

    But even if you don't heat, it would not be a bad idea to insulate, in that size coop it *will* buffer your nighttime lows somewhat even without electric heat. Remember tho that you still need adequate ventilation open, yes even in the winter and even if you insulate and even if you run a heatlamp.

    Good luck, ahve fun,

    Pat
     
  4. 10 point

    10 point country boy

    Feb 19, 2011
    LaFayette, NY
    we live in central new york and do not have insulation and only turn theheat lamp on when it's below zero. we only had one with a frosbit comb and that was a brody sitting in a plastic nest from the condesation
    hope this helps
     
  5. teach1rusl

    teach1rusl Love My Chickens

    Pat said this already, I'm just 2nding it...if you're going to use any kind of supplemental heat, it would be smart to insulate. It will stetch your supplemental heat substantially since it won't be going straight through the ceiling and walls. I also agree with CCharm - just because most chickens can handle pretty cold temps. doesn't mean freezing temps are ideal for them.
     
  6. countrychix

    countrychix Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 18, 2010
    Frewsburg, NY
    I live in SWNY. My coop is not insulated and the girls did just fine in spite of the fact that nearly half of them had no feathers on their backs- from picking each other and compliments of the roo. I did have a heat lamp on in there when the forecast was for below zero temps but only used it maybe 4 times (nights) all winter. The heat lamp increased my electric bill by a dollar a day last spring when I was brooding chicks, just too costly for me to run unnecessarily. My girls continued to lay throughout the winter- 19 girls averaging 13 eggs a day.
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2011
  7. happyhensny

    happyhensny Brown Barns Farm

    I am afraid to use heat lamps unless absolutely necessary, baby chicks. I am just outside Albany, we had -20*+ this past winter. No heat. If you allow the birds to feather in through the fall without supplemental heat then they will be fine. On the nights that call for extremely cold weather put some vaseline on those with large combs and wattles. Use sufficient bedding, it will give off some warmth. Insulation is a great idea. It will also help to keep out drafts. Remember though that the moist air needs to get out so some vents at the top of the building will allow air exchange.
     
  8. featherz

    featherz Veggie Chick

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    Mar 22, 2010
    Saratoga County, NY
    I live in upstate NY also. No heat all winter and my coops are thin plywood. All did fine, even my skinny leghorns and my bantams.
     
  9. jerseygirl1

    jerseygirl1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:ditto - I even stuck the goats in there when it got too cold [​IMG]
     
  10. happyhensny

    happyhensny Brown Barns Farm

    Quote:ditto - I even stuck the goats in there when it got too cold [​IMG]

    I love goats-and chickens-and quail. And, well lots of stuff. [​IMG]
     

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