1. foxchasr

    foxchasr Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 1, 2009
    Hi everyone ... my boyfriend wants to insulate our coop (see pic below) for the winter, as well as trying to contain the never ending crowing while they are inside from our 2 roosters [​IMG] Does anyone have any suggestions on what type of insulation to use? They are free roaming, but our town ordinance only allows 8 hens, no roosters and I would like to try and make every attempt possible to keep our roosters. Please help!



    [​IMG]
     
  2. Schultz

    Schultz CluckN'Crow Farm

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    The higher the R value, the denser it is thus the more sound protection or deadening you get from it. Get the highest R value you can afford. Maybe R-30? Use the batting and then panel the inside to cover up the insulation or the chickens will eat it/destroy it.
     
  3. teach1rusl

    teach1rusl Love My Chickens

    While thick insulation definitely DOES help muffle sounds (such as crowing), you'll find that your boys will most likely crow at any given time during the day...not just in the early hours. So unless you plan on keeping your roos contained 24/7 (which wouldn't be much quality of life for them IMO), your neighbors WILL eventually figure out that you have roosters. Now, whether anyone complains or not... [​IMG] Glad I live in the country...
     
  4. Nekhebet

    Nekhebet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We are building a shell, putting sound deadening floor underlay on the outside, then insulation, then a much thicker wood outer shell. The roof will be sloped, insulated...then I'm thinking of adding that egg carton stuff on the interior of the roof [​IMG]
    I don't trust the neighbors not to complain, not leaving the birds out in winter, though at that point maybe we could
     
  5. Mac in Wisco

    Mac in Wisco Antagonist

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    Quote:Density doesn't have much to do with the R-Value. R-30 fiberglass batting is 11" thick. There would be no room left inside there.

    I'd suggest using 2" thick polystyrene panels. These are pink or blue foam insulating panels. They can be easily cut to size with a utility knife. Fit them to the inside walls and seal all gaps and cracks with house wrap tape. The goal is to ensure no air can get behind the foam panels. If moist air gets between the walls and the foam panels you'll end with with condensation trapped back there and you will get mold, mildew, and rot.

    Once everything is insulated and taped up you can cover the insulation with paneling.

    You still need to provide adequate ventilation. Insulate the inside walls and the ceiling but leave a couple of vents up high for natural ventilation.
     
  6. Tdub4chiks

    Tdub4chiks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Great coop.[​IMG]
     
  7. Schultz

    Schultz CluckN'Crow Farm

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    Indianapolis
    Quote:Density doesn't have much to do with the R-Value. R-30 fiberglass batting is 11" thick. There would be no room left inside there.

    I'd suggest using 2" thick polystyrene panels. These are pink or blue foam insulating panels. They can be easily cut to size with a utility knife. Fit them to the inside walls and seal all gaps and cracks with house wrap tape. The goal is to ensure no air can get behind the foam panels. If moist air gets between the walls and the foam panels you'll end with with condensation trapped back there and you will get mold, mildew, and rot.

    Once everything is insulated and taped up you can cover the insulation with paneling.

    You still need to provide adequate ventilation. Insulate the inside walls and the ceiling but leave a couple of vents up high for natural ventilation.

    Hmmm. ok, thanks! I was misinformed. Sorry! That is just what another guy told me and I thought that he was right all this time... hmmf! Oh well, Thanks for the correction anyhow.
     
  8. LynneP

    LynneP Chillin' With My Peeps

  9. Mac in Wisco

    Mac in Wisco Antagonist

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    Quote:How thick are your walls? It says it was R-25 insulation, but R-25 is for 2x10 framing. With 2x4 framing the best you can get with fiberglass batts is R-15. R-11 batts are economy batts, R-13 used to be the max for 2x4 construction and was a bit pricier. They now sell R-15 batts for 2x4 walls and they are priced accordingly.

    That is the way to do it though. Whether you are using foam or batts the interior needs to have a vapor barrier to keep humid air away from the cold exterior walls. If using foam, it is its own vapor barrier. Batts need to be covered with kraft paper or a plastic vapor barrier that is air tight.
     
  10. Lifestyle Lift Journey

    Lifestyle Lift Journey Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 2, 2010
    Batts or panels would be good I recon.
    There are cheaper stuff like reflecting metal sheets that are a bit like kitchen aluminum foil. I don't recommend them because they can be a fire hazard or worse.
    If you decided to use those metal sheets, make sure you use plastic nails to hold in place, not ordinary metal nails, because if you manage to touch electricity for some reason, you would be zapped!
     

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