1. Irishhenman

    Irishhenman Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I want to insulate some of my hen houses. I want a cheep way of doing it. I was thinking of putting layers of news paper glued on to the walls or maybe even some straw. I would love to hear about other ways I could do it. Thanks
     
  2. Roxannemc

    Roxannemc Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Newspaper sou nds good I might cover it with cardboard as last year i insulated mine with silver backed styrofoam .they pecked it to pieces.I still have tiny silver pieces all over the yard.I finally did add sone cardboard over it but too late.
     
  3. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote: That will provide no "insulation" at all, but it will block wind if there are any gaps in your walls.

    Insulation needs to be loose and bulky to really work, and most organic materials won't last long enough to make them worth the effort.

    FEATHERS would be the best free material, but I'd suggest looking for some demolition/construction sites to see if you could pick up some REAL insulation

    Spend the money for actual insulation, and it will last nearly forever, vs something you'd need to do over in a couple of years
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2013
  4. Mass Mike

    Mass Mike Out Of The Brooder

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    Drafts and wind are a much bigger problem than the cold itself. Your aim ought to be a draft free coop with appropriate ventilation. Winter nights in MA are routinely in the single digits, and it is not uncommon to have sub-zero temps. If you have cold-tolerant birds appropriate for your climate, they will provide their own insulation by way of their winter coat of feathers. We use no insulation but rather, on those cold nights, run an extension cord out there and install a 250w heat lamp (the same kind we use in the brooder). This provides more than enough warmth for them. We usually only turn the heat lamp on if the temp reaches 15 degrees or lower.
    Depending on how your coop is made, there are lots of options to help draft-proof it.
    hope this helps.
     
  5. Irishhenman

    Irishhenman Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have draft proofed the coops already but some of my birds seem very cold. The RIR's and Orps are fine but the serama's and anconas are not coping so well even though it is not very cold here, maybe about -5 or -6 (23 Fahrenheit )on the coldest winter days that is why I needs to insulate the house
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2013
  6. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    Adding insulaton won't make it warmer unless you add supplemental heat also.
    It has very little effect in WELL VENTILATED spaces

    Add the heat first
     
  7. Irishhenman

    Irishhenman Chillin' With My Peeps

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    ok, could you suggest some ways of making the house warmer without using a heat lamp as that is completely out of the question
     
  8. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    Light bulbs are the easiest way.
    If you don't have electricity there are very few options available
     
  9. sn0wwhite

    sn0wwhite Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Irishhenman, why do you think they are cold? What kind of behavior indicates that? I'm new to chickens so I'm wondering what to look for.
     
  10. Hokum Coco

    Hokum Coco Overrun With Chickens

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    Some people heat their coops to 70ยบ F during the winter months. If the hydro should fail they bring their birds into the house until the hydro is restored. That sounds like a good method if you want to supply heat to your birds.
    They get excellent egg production and happy hens.
    If you are allergic to feathers or bird dandruff I suggest to dress warmly and stay outside until you can return your birds to the coop .
     

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