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  1. Justins Wife

    Justins Wife Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 4, 2014
    Bedford
    Hi, this is my first winter with my flock-6 rhode island reds, and 4 blue splash marans. My coop is home built of decking boards, 8x5x6, I have the ceiling insulated with regular house insulation, and I put up foam insulation on the inside today, b/c temps are to get really really frigid here in PA. Is that ok? Or should I not have done that? I also have a good layer of straw on the floor of the coop, and in the nesting boxes.
    Thanks!
     
  2. jetdog

    jetdog Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 18, 2013
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    Anything is better than nothing just hope you covered the insulation with plywood or something else so they can't peck at it because they will.
     
  3. Jwiley1

    Jwiley1 New Egg

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    Jan 4, 2014
    I have the same type of insulation on the walls of my coop. Is it bad for them to peck at it? I have foam in the rafters and on parts of the wall. Is it harmful to the chickens?
     
  4. RhodeIslandRedFan

    RhodeIslandRedFan Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 10, 2009
    Central PA
    I live in Central PA, have had chickens for several years, my coop is not insulated and my chickens have done well. I use wood shavings on the floor of the coop, and my roosts are 4 X 4s, so that their feet are covered by their feathers when they roost, helping to keep their feet warmer at night. I have a mixed flock including RIRs, a buff orpington, a black sex-link, a barred rock, a leghorn, and some mixed breeds. Straw is also a very good insulating material on the floor. I agree that if you insulate you will want to make sure the insulation material is covered so that your chickens do not peck at/eat it. I've read posts over the years on here where that has happened. Please make sure you have adequate ventilation in the upper area of your coop, so that moisture from their breathing and droppings is able to escape. From what I've read that helps reduce the risk of frostbite. I worry about my girls whenever the weather turns cold, but then realize they have it much better than wild birds who have no coops for shelter and do well anyway. Welcome to BYC! Nice to see a neighbor from PA :)
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. Justins Wife

    Justins Wife Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 4, 2014
    Bedford
    Thanks for all the info! I didn't have any plywood to put up over the foam, I'll have to wait until I get paid.
     
  6. Justins Wife

    Justins Wife Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 4, 2014
    Bedford
    [​IMG]
    They seem happy!
     
  7. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    SW Michigan
    My Coop
    You could also use empty feed bags to cover the insulation, remove the bottom seam, slit up the side and you've got a fairly large sheet of material. Use short drywall screws to attach to the wall.
     
  8. RhodeIslandRedFan

    RhodeIslandRedFan Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 10, 2009
    Central PA
    [​IMG] I live about 20 miles northwest of Harrisburg. Coldest weather I can remember for many years - I know you are colder than we are here. Brrrr.....
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2014
  9. Hokum Coco

    Hokum Coco Overrun With Chickens

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    Last edited: Jan 8, 2014
  10. Justins Wife

    Justins Wife Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 4, 2014
    Bedford
    Actually, they haven't messed with it!
     
    1 person likes this.

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