Integrating at one week old (with mother)

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by ChickenKeep01, Mar 23, 2017.

  1. ChickenKeep01

    ChickenKeep01 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My Japanese bantam hatched 5 chicks a week ago and i have 2 isa browns in my flock so i was worried about putting them into the flock early so i was keeping them in the brooder (with their mother and i was letting them out for about a hour each day) but today i put her and the chicks in with my flock which consist of 2 isa browns 2 pekin bantams and 1 japanese banatm rooster (and the mother except for when shes on eggs) and they seemed to be fine so im wondering if i can let them into the flock now or if i should wait longer and if i can let them in now how should i go about it? 24 hours of "see no touch", just put them straight in since the mother is already familiar with the others or any other form of integrating. Thanks.
     
  2. azygous

    azygous True BYC Addict

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    The broody should be able to protect her chick should the others get ideas to mess with it. I would return the two to the flock and watch for a while and see how the other chickens react and how the broody handles herself.

    When I had a broody hatch a single chick last summer, I kept them separate for a week, and then I let the broody take her chick to visit the rest of the run at will. She is a feisty Speckled Sussex and bossy on a mellow day, so she brooked no foolishness from the flock.

    She raised her chick to be self confident and neither one had any problems with the rest of the flock of two dozen chickens.
     
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  3. chickens really

    chickens really Chicken Obsessed

    I keep mine separate till 3 weeks...It will not matter....If they are not bothering with the Chicks?....Leave Momma and the Chicks with the flock...All my Birds love the Chicks....:)


    Cheers!
     
  4. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Flock Master

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    Broody hormones are strongest for the first 2 weeks after hatch. Along with those hormones goes a fierce protective instinct. Usually. My broody 2 years ago was a bottom of the pecking order gal, and I had one or two hens who delighted in separating her from her chicks. Given that the animals do not read the "how to" books, you can make an educated guess about what is most likely to happen, then, watch to see if it does. I'd feel confident with introductions at 1 - 2 weeks. By then, the babies will have their flight feathers, so will be more successful at keeping up with Mama, evading flock members, and navigating the pop door.
     
  5. ChickenKeep01

    ChickenKeep01 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well I put them into together today and within 30 seconds one of my Isa Browns was attacking a chick and if I wasn't the I doubt any of them would be alive now
     
  6. chickens really

    chickens really Chicken Obsessed

    That's not good...Possibly it's caused because you have Hybrid layers...?...What is the protein percentage in your feed?....Hybrids require 18 % protein.....

    Sorry that happened...Wait a couple of more weeks.....:(.....

    Cheers!
     
  7. ChickenKeep01

    ChickenKeep01 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    well its all good now they are all ok i doubt the one that got attacked even remembers it i'll check the protein in the morning its 10 pm for me.
     
  8. chickens really

    chickens really Chicken Obsessed



    I am glad that worked out.....I have no issues adding My Hens and Chicks....For sure check the protein in your feed....:)


    Best wishes and congrats.....:)


    Cheers!
     
  9. azygous

    azygous True BYC Addict

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    That must have been an awful scare. It's always good to referee when you expect questionable results. I had a similar scare when I tried to introduce store bought chicks to a broody with a day old hatchling. I was quick and snatched them all away before any could be hurt.

    I forget if you told us how old the Isa Browns are. Pullets are more likely to be bullies to chicks than mature hens, an additional factor we should have looked at.

    All's well that ends well, but sorry you had that stressful episode.

    Maybe we can help you explore a strategy for next time you try to introduce the broody and the chicks.
     
  10. ChickenKeep01

    ChickenKeep01 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Im not sure on their exact age but i think they are just over 1 year old
     

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