Integrating with different feed requirements.

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by StephensonC, Jan 21, 2015.

  1. StephensonC

    StephensonC Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have some 5 week old chicks that I will be moving at some point into a pen with adult chickens. The older ones are on layer feed and the chicks will still require the chick grower feed. How does everyone do this with the different feed requirements for each age group?
     
  2. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Feed them all what the chicks are eating and offer oyster shell of some other calcium source for the laying hens on the side. The ones that need the calcium for egg shells normally eat enough and the ones that don’t need the extra calcium should not eat enough to harm themselves.
     
  3. StephensonC

    StephensonC Chillin' With My Peeps

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    OK thanks!! I should have mentioned that the chicks' feed is medicated. Is is ok for the older ones to have that or do I need to change to unmedicated?
     
  4. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Of course you need to know what the medicine is in medicated feed to properly answer that. Check the label to see what it says the active ingredients are. The odds are really high it is Amprolium, but I don’t like putting my family’s health at risk on a probably.

    If it is Amprolium and Amprolium is the only active ingredient, the USDA and Purina says there is no withdrawal period for eating the eggs. I’ve pointedly asked Purina twice if that means that you can continue feeding the Amprolium-medicated feed to laying hens and they just use that “no withdrawal period” quote without answering the question. My guess is that their lawyers won’t let them vary from that USDA language. I’m not a medical person so I won’t offer an opinion on how safe it is to continue feeding Amprolium medicated feed to laying hens.

    Amprolium is not an antibiotic. It will not mess up any probiotics in the chick’s system like an antibiotic would. Its sole purpose is to restrict the Coccidiosis bug’s reproduction in the chick’s system so the number of Coccidiosis bugs don’t get out of control. The problems with Coccidiosis come when the number of bugs get out of hand.

    After two to three weeks of continuous exposure to that bug, the chick will develop immunity to that strain of Coccidiosis. So if your chicks have had contact with the ground for three weeks they just about have to have that immunity and don’t need the medicated feed any longer. I purposely feed dirt from the run to my chicks a day or so after I put them in the brooder and feed them more as I go along so by the time they hit the ground they have developed immunity.
     
  5. StephensonC

    StephensonC Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You are right. It's medicated with the Amprolium. Glad you pointed out the tid bit from the USDA & Purina. I hadn't even thought of that. The older chickens that I'm merging them with are just a rooster and 1 hen. I won't have to worry about him eating it, but the hen is laying, so I'm not sure if I would want to eat those eggs. I could always move her to another flock, but that would be a whole nother story...lol The rooster doesn't mate for some unknown reason, so I wouldn't need to worry about him eating it, then fertilizing the eggs, and the Amprolium getting in the eggs that way. But, I have no idea if that's even possible.

    The chicks are still in a large brooder, but are growing quickly. I thought about giving them some clovers from the yard, but was worried they might catch something. Thanks for the tip. I will definitely give them some now with some root and dirt attached to try to boost their immunity.

    Thank you so much. This is the first time I've raised chicks. I've always got mine as pullets, so I'm learning a lot as I go. And thanks for pointing out the info!!
     
  6. tuner06

    tuner06 Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi ridgerunner
    Now I know medicated feed and corid are different things. But I've used corid
    And my vet said said that there is a 10 day withdraw for eggs. I'm figuring since
    The medicated feed contains the same thing as corid that it may have the same
    Withdrawal for eggs.
     
  7. matt44644

    matt44644 Chillin' With My Peeps

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  8. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    I like to feed a 'flock raiser' 20% protein crumble to all ages and genders, as non-layers(chicks, males and all molting birds) do not need the extra calcium that is in layer feed and chicks and molters can use the extra protein. Makes life much simpler to store and distribute one type of chow that everyone can eat.

    Calcium should be available at all times for the layers, oyster shell mixed with rinsed, dried, crushed chicken egg shells in a separate container.

    The higher protein crumble offsets the 8% protein scratch grains and other kitchen/garden scraps I like to offer.
     
  9. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Sorry, Matt but I could not fond a statement about laying hens being fed Amprolium in either link. Could you please point me in the right direction? I know there is no withdrawal period for meat birds and none for laying hens, but I cannot find where it clearly says laying hens can be fed Amprolium

    Turner, the dosage of Amprolium in Corid is much higher than in medicated feed. The dosage in medicated feed is low as a preventative. The Amprolium in Corid is much more concentrated as a treatment.
     

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