Interesting Article on Monsato

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by Sparklecoon, May 27, 2008.

  1. kstaven

    kstaven Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Jan 26, 2007
    BC, Washington Border
    I've read many articles like this. I only wish they would tell the full story on the dairy industry and why they have chosen to push cows so hard. I am very happy this product is banned here and the information below is not meant to be in defense of rbgh by any means. But to add some information that it seems is never published in articles like the one above.

    I will use a small dairy farm just down the road from me as an example because I am well acquainted with it.

    What we deal with here is something called "dairy quota" administered by the "dairy board". This is a fee paid for the pleasure of being able to milk a cow and sell that milk to a dairy processor, or directly pasteurize and sell to the consumer in the form of milk, cheese, etc. While it is often published and quoted as to what the dairy system pays its farmer for each gallon of milk, it seems the quota fees the farmer pays are never published.

    The dairy I eluded to earlier milks 45 cows at any given time. Dairy quota fees for this operation are just over $900,000.00. So just over $20,000.00 per cow, is paid to the board before one single drop of milk can be sold. Add to that feed, electricity, buildings, equipment, licensing, insurance, labour and other day to day costs and you start to see why small dairies are rare at best and new starts are almost unheard of. The margin between profit and bankruptcy is very slim due to the draconian fees imposed upon them by an organization that was originally started to supposedly protect them and your dairy supply.

    So in order to survive many dairies have turned to what ever they could get their hands on to boost output and ensure their survival. I have had the opportunity to speak with a number of OLD dairymen and there is a very real feeling of betrayal, shame and sense of being forced to take steps they would have normally never taken in order to survive and continue to support their families.
     
  2. chickbea

    chickbea Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 18, 2007
    Vermont
    Personally, I think animals and the products they provide are a gift of nature, and I think it is an obscenity to try to force greater production.
     
  3. tiki244

    tiki244 Flock Mistress

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    [​IMG] yes there certainly are a lot of articles. More and more these days it seems to be a trend towards all natural and organic live off the land.movement. Although I tend to agree with this side of thinking, most articles in magazines and such dont cover a subject thoroughly enough for a person to make a truly informed decission. And most people wouldnt have the time or... patience to wade through it.
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2008
  4. tiki244

    tiki244 Flock Mistress

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    WestCentralWisconsin
    WOW kstaven that is horrible :| I never knew that [​IMG] that is just not right
     
  5. dacjohns

    dacjohns People Cracker Upper

    And most of the vegetable garden seed comes from Monsanto. It used to be better living through chemistry. Now it's better living through chemistry and GMOs.
     
  6. dacjohns

    dacjohns People Cracker Upper

    tiki

    What is it like in dairy land with all the controversy over the growth hormones. When I lived in Wisconsin I learned some interesting things about milk production.
     
  7. me&thegals

    me&thegals Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Wisconsin
    Quote:Are you certain of this? I am NO friend of Monsanto (don't even get me started) but I had never heard that they dealt in garden seed--mainly GMO for cotton, soy and corn. I know many of my garden catalogues have lots of hybrid varieties (except my Seeds of Change and Seed Saver's Exchange), but that's a whole different dog than GMO...
     
  8. me&thegals

    me&thegals Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 30, 2008
    Wisconsin
    kstaven--thanks for the perspective from the other side. These issues get so hot that it's hard to step back and try to see the reasoning from the other side.

    My husband is a crop farmer who has bought seed from Monsanto. He has very few other options from seed dealers in our area. Until this year, his crop prices have been horrific. It is very difficult for a small farmer to get by, and so they go for the highest yield possible, even if that includes GMO. Even if most of the GMO corn goes to ethanol anyway.

    I, on the other hand, have an organic CSA garden. So, as you can imagine, we "discuss" these issues with great passion and vehemence in our home! There are really many sides to every issue.

    Unfortunately, it usually comes down to money. If you want GMO-free food, buy organic. It will cost you more, but you will be certain of getting GMO-free food. People (farmers) will grow what people are paying for. In America, though, we are used to really, really cheap food and really, really cheap gas. But, with the explosion of the organic food sector in our country, you can bet that farmers are paying attention. Unfortunately, they don't get help in that tough 3-year transition time from conventional to organic.

    So, I think it comes down to money and politics... Just my opinion...
     
  9. eggzettera

    eggzettera Chillin' With My Peeps

    From the Organic Consumers Association:

    'FRANKENFOODS' SURVEY OF THE WEEK:
    CBS NEWS & NEW YORK TIMES POLL CONSUMERS ABOUT GE FOODS

    * 53%: Percentage of polled Americans who say they won't buy food that has ingredients from genetically engineered (GE) plants.
    * 65%: Actual percentage of products on grocery store shelves that contain unlabeled GE ingredients (usually soy or corn derived).
    * 90%: Portion of U.S. grown soybeans that are genetically engineered.
    * 99%: Estimated likelihood that the U.S. sugar supply will start to be sourced from genetically engineered plants this year.
     

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