Interesting article on predators

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by thebirdguy, Jan 6, 2011.

  1. thebirdguy

    thebirdguy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 22, 2010
    Idaho Falls
  2. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

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    That was an absolutely fascinating article. Thank you for sharing it with us.
     
  3. theFox

    theFox Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 21, 2009
    Standish, Maine
    Conditioned Taste Aversion, sounds like it might work.

    Now where did I put that syrup of ipecac.
     
  4. SuziQ991

    SuziQ991 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Great reading!
     
  5. calista

    calista Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 27, 2010
    That was a terrific read, with much food for thought about approaching predator control in an entirely different manner than we poultry keepers have been CONDITIONED OURSELVES to follow. The "see any predator, shoot it" mentality that I am guilty of myself, having been raised that way on a farm.

    Thanks for posting it. [​IMG]
     
  6. babalubird

    babalubird Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Very interesting. Thanks.
     
  7. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

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    Quote:That was the part that was most fascinating. I think that an animal would be able to taste/smell syrup of ipecac because of it's rather distinctive taste/strong odor, thereby making it unsuitable to use as a training aid, but what about stringing a bait on a hot wire? If your chickens are killed by a predator, why not put the remains on a hot line? We all know that predators tend to return to the scene of the kill. I wonder if that would work to condition local predators to avoid chickens. I almost never lose birds to ground predators anymore. I use baited electric fences and supervise during free-range times, so my flock is pretty safe, but I will be trying out some CTA on my first next casualty.
     
  8. greenriver

    greenriver Chillin' With My Peeps

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    "Maybe one of humankind's most troublesome creatures will be the one to lure us from our own shadows, into a place of even greater human and nature co-existence. "

    What a bunch of BS....LOL.
     
  9. Talihofarms

    Talihofarms Chillin' With My Peeps

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    A good read. I will have to agree with the respect the yote gives a large dog. Since we introduced our large dog the yotes stay away.
    Although sometimes in summer the pack comes in close. Only at night. Haven't had too shoot one in 2 years.

    Now the birds of prey............ are not up for conditioning.








    just my.02
     
  10. thebirdguy

    thebirdguy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Idaho Falls
    Quote:That was the part that was most fascinating. I think that an animal would be able to taste/smell syrup of ipecac because of it's rather distinctive taste/strong odor, thereby making it unsuitable to use as a training aid, but what about stringing a bait on a hot wire? If your chickens are killed by a predator, why not put the remains on a hot line? We all know that predators tend to return to the scene of the kill. I wonder if that would work to condition local predators to avoid chickens. I almost never lose birds to ground predators anymore. I use baited electric fences and supervise during free-range times, so my flock is pretty safe, but I will be trying out some CTA on my first next casualty.

    I've heard of people stringing bacon on their electric fence to "train" local dogs etc not to enter.
     

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