Interesting article regarding commercially raised meat chickens in US

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by Armyman2007, Jan 18, 2010.

  1. Armyman2007

    Armyman2007 Out Of The Brooder

    17
    0
    22
    Jan 14, 2010
    World

    Putin Says Chlorine in Chickens Unsafe
    by Dan Flynn | Jan 16, 2010
    Getting another American chicken into Russia just got harder.

    Prime Minister Vladimir Putin weighted into the Russian ban on U.S. chicken imports.

    "We haven't seen any readiness to meet Russian standards on the part of some of our partners, mainly the companies from the United States," Putin said. "If our foreign suppliers are unable or reluctant to meet our security requirements, we will use other sources."

    The Russians banned chickens from countries using chlorine in poultry processing beginning Jan. 1 2010. Putin made the Americans the odd man out saying that Russia was merely joining the European Union in banning, for food safety reasons, chickens from chlorine-using counties.

    "One shouldn't look for political background in this case, God forbid," said Russia's former President and one-time KGB agent. "No political background here!"

    Putin attended a meeting on Russian poultry production where it was announced that the country would import a total of 780,000 metric tons of poultry in 2010, and then continue to reduce imports in the years ahead.

    The American quota would be 600,000 metric tons for 2010, down 20 percent from 2009. Since the ban, however, prices for American poultry in Russia are up about 20 percent.

    Putin wants Russia to be poultry self-sufficient by 2015.

    Since Russia raised the possibility of banning U.S. chickens for chlorine use in mid 2008, the USA Poultry & Egg Export Council has tried to persuade officials in Moscow by sharing scientific studies. The poultry export market to Russia was valued at $825 million in 2008.

    "The U.S. industry is committed to providing safe and healthful products to consumers in the United States as well as those in over 130 countries around the world, including Russia," the USA Poultry and Egg Council said in a letter to Russian officials in late 2009,

    The letter said the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) recommends the "use of hypochlorus (i.e. active chlorine) solutions as an effective antimicrobial.

    "Based on a substantial body of scientific studies, FSIS' best practices recommendations is to use 20-50 ppm of free available chlorine in immersion chilling systems."

    Before the prime minister got involved in the issue, many on the American side were optimistic about getting American chickens back into Russia. Now, however, Putin's response to American arguments about the safety and science behind chlorine can pretty much be summer up in one word: "Nyet."
     
  2. Chickie'sMoma

    Chickie'sMoma Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 21, 2009
    Rochester, NH
    interesting. i didn't know we did that here in the US. good thing i've been thinking of raising a few birds for our own meat.
     
  3. kooltex

    kooltex Chillin' With My Peeps

    388
    0
    119
    Oct 15, 2009
    NE Tx
    20-50 ppm, thats a lot of chlorine! No wonder those birds have no taste.
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2010
  4. PineappleMama

    PineappleMama Chillin' With My Peeps

    Like chlorine in our pools, drinking water, cleaning supplies, and more recently our sugar (Splenda = chlorinated sugar = not in my house) isn't enough? I love bleach for cleaning, I do. It's the ONLY thing recommended by the CDC to kill bacteria AND viruses. It's perfect for floors, toilets, sinks, tubs... you know, all those places you DON'T put your mouth??

    Ohhh... HA! Now I have a great excuse for all my gray hair! It's not AGE... NOoooo it's the bleach in the chicken. [​IMG]
     
  5. Buster52

    Buster52 Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,635
    32
    228
    Jan 28, 2009
    Geronimo Oklahoma
    The letter said the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) recommends the "use of hypochlorus (i.e. active chlorine) solutions as an effective antimicrobial.

    "Based on a substantial body of scientific studies, FSIS' best practices recommendations is to use 20-50 ppm of free available chlorine in immersion chilling systems."

    And what the letter neglected to say is that the recommendation is due to the high level of contamination in commercial poultry operations and large scale automated slaughterhouses. All it takes in a well-run pastured poultry farm is a little tap water. The only way that Big Poultry is going to be able to meet Russia's requirements is to significantly change their ways.

    Like a leopard changing its spots.​
     
  6. kooltex

    kooltex Chillin' With My Peeps

    388
    0
    119
    Oct 15, 2009
    NE Tx
    Yeah, and to think they recommend not going into a pool if the chlorine is above 4 ppm!
     
  7. Kim_NC

    Kim_NC Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 27, 2009
    Mt Airy, NC
    Quote:And what the letter neglected to say is that the recommendation is due to the high level of contamination in commercial poultry operations and large scale automated slaughterhouses. All it takes in a well-run pastured poultry farm is a little tap water. The only way that Big Poultry is going to be able to meet Russia's requirements is to significantly change their ways.

    Like a leopard changing its spots.

    True. And the bigger issue here is the antibiotics. Notice that last paragraph starts out with
    Before the prime minister got involved in the issue, many on the American side were optimistic about getting American chickens back into Russia.

    Russia initially banned poultry from most US plants in 2006 or 2007 for the use of antibiotics previously only used for humans. Their objection is based on the levels of antibiotic residues actually found in the meat. The thinking being that could allow virus/disease strains to develop and leave us defenseless, with no antibiotics to prevent disease spreading in the human population. A valid point, IMO. Not to mention, they also object to the levels of arsenic residue found.

    Sure, some of it is politics - and they hurt us by hitting our industry in the wallet with banning - but one has to concede they have a point. At least they are protecting their citizens from the undesirable and dangerous practices of Big Poultry. And on another note, they're now talking the same for pork - test results show objectionable antibiotic residue in the meat.

    Lots of articles on the poultry bans linked from this page for those interested:
    http://resources.bnet.com/topic/poultry+and+russia.html
     
  8. comp6512

    comp6512 Chillin' With My Peeps

    152
    1
    121
    Dec 3, 2008
    What I'm amazed is that our own country does not ban chlorinated chickens. Citizenry is mainly unaware, but more importantly, is hooked on a cheap chicken in every pot. People don't want it healthy, they want it cheap.
     
  9. Neil Grassbaugh

    Neil Grassbaugh Chillin' With My Peeps

    741
    14
    151
    Sep 1, 2008
    Quote:The Russians are the same. They can buy chicken meat cheaper from other countries if they can escape trade agreements with the US if what we offer is "unsafe".
    It is like the Japanese. They have to buy our chicken if we buy their cars. Unless they can use "unsafe" as a reason to not allow our food into their country. We however cannot claim that their automobiles or electronics have been dipped in sanitizers or carry avian influenza. So we have to continue buying items like that to maintain trade. Trade good, economic predation bad.
    Enjoy your shopping trip to walmart or the toyota dealer.
     
  10. CARS

    CARS Chillin' With My Peeps

    From Wiki: "In nature, chlorine is found primarily as the chloride ion, a component of the salt that is deposited in the earth or dissolved in the oceans."

    Alright. I brine my birds for a day in a salt water bath. Many do. I doubt that packaging plants brine any longer than they have to.

    What's the difference?
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by