Interesting hatch

Discussion in 'Quail' started by Pavo Royale, Nov 15, 2009.

  1. Pavo Royale

    Pavo Royale Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 6, 2009
    Gainesville, GA
    I had a mixture of about twenty cotornix qauil, all but one that were the standard color. They were laying about five eggs a day and I incubated about 30 eggs with five hatching (terrible, I know). None of the others were fertile. Now comes the interesting part...one of the parent stock was the dark variety; we always called it chocolate. Well, every one of these five are "chocolate", no standards. Go figure!
     
  2. thatchickenlady

    thatchickenlady Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 15, 2009
    New York
    That is an interesting and fun result![​IMG]
     
  3. BorderKelpie

    BorderKelpie Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 1, 2009
    outside Dallas
    I wanna see!
    Sounds pretty
     
  4. shelleyd2008

    shelleyd2008 the bird is the word

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    Sep 14, 2008
    Adair Co., KY
    That's because chocolate, otherwise known as tibetan, is dominant over just about every other color [​IMG]
     
  5. Pavo Royale

    Pavo Royale Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That's because chocolate, otherwise known as tibetan, is dominant over just about every other color

    I do not think it is that easy. If tibetan is dominant, which I believe it is, then that alone would not explain these results. From pure genetics and statistical probabiliy I would have had other standard cotornix in the mix. The chances of all five fertile eggs being tibetan are just too small. The one dark bird that had the gene had to be the only fertile bird of that gender in the parent stock. The probability of this happening with a recessive gene would be far, far less and would probabily not occur, even with the one dark bird being the only vaible producer.​
     
  6. shelleyd2008

    shelleyd2008 the bird is the word

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    Adair Co., KY
    You've lost me. Tibetan is dominant, and if the tibetan is a male (which you never did say), it would be totally possible for all the chicks to be tibetan.
     
  7. canter6

    canter6 Cooped up

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    Oct 12, 2009
    Dacula,GA.
    I'm lost as well.

    It's been my short experience with light/white coturnix plus any brown, that brown trumps white in the first generation.
    I have 11 chicks in my brooder right now that are a product of 2 brown roos + 5 A&M hens, and every one is brown.
    That's not scientific, but pretty much what I was expecting.
     
  8. Pavo Royale

    Pavo Royale Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Gainesville, GA
    I suspect that the dark bird was female and the only girl in the bunch laying good eggs. 1 out of 5 eggs per day were fertile and they were all dark. I think this is the only way this could have happened. Maybe I think too much
     
  9. JJMR794

    JJMR794 Overrun With Chickens

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    Mar 2, 2009
    BROOKSVILLE FL
    Pavo You May Be Onto Somethin.... Outta All The Girls You Got Workin For You It Sounds Likely That Only 1 Is Actually Making The Fertile Eggs. Or It Could Be That Only 1 Of Your Roos Is Up To The Task In This Lower Light Season?
     
  10. Pavo Royale

    Pavo Royale Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 6, 2009
    Gainesville, GA
    There was some reason I didn't think it was a male. Oh yeah, even one fertile male could probabily keep up with the five or so hens and all of the eggs would have been good. And dark.
     

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