interesting study on what may be killing bees

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by backdoorchicken, May 14, 2011.

  1. backdoorchicken

    backdoorchicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    http://www.digitaltrends.com/mobile/cell-phones-signals-really-are-killing-the-bees-study-shows/


    A
    new study shows that cell phone signals confuse bees so badly it kills them.



    If there’s one thing people around the world love to do — in fact, need to do — it’s eat. Unfortunately, another thing everyone likes to do is talk on their cell phones. And according to a new study (PDF), these two activities are completely at odds because of a cell phone signal’s confusing effects on one key player: bees.

    Researcher Daniel Favre of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology has found that wireless signals cause honeybees to become so disoriented that they finally just die. Favre’s team conducted 83 separate experiments that tested bees’ reactions to a nearby cellphone.

    The team found that honeybees made 10 times the amount of noise when a cell phone made or received a call than they did when the phone was in off or standby mode. As Fast Company reports, this noise (generally known as “worker piping”) usually signals the bees to leave the hive. But when the reaction is triggered by a cellular signal, the bees just became tragically befuddled.


    So, what about a cell phone signal makes bees suicidally crazy? As Favre’s report explains: “Worker piping in a bee colony is not frequent, and when it occurs in a colony, that is not in a swarming process, no more than two bees are simultaneously active…The induction of honeybee worker piping by the electromagneti c fields of mobile phones might have dramatic consequences in terms of colony losses due to unexpected swarming.”

    It’s the “dramatic…colony losses” part that everyone should be concerned about. Honeybees are responsible for pollinating about 70 percent of the 100 or so crops on the entire planet that humans use for food.

    So-called “colony collapse disorder” among the world’s bee population has been recorded since 1972. But it wasn’t until 2006 that the drop in the bee population took a nosedive, with beekeepers noting a 30 to 90 percent loss of their bee colonies, up from 17 to 20 percent in previous years.

    Favre’s study corroborates a 2008 report that showed that honeybees would not return to their hive when a cell phone was placed nearby, which sparked the theory that wireless signals are the problem.

    There are other reasons scientists believe the world’s crucial bee population is plummeting, things like the use of clothiandin, a pesticide used to treat corn seeds. But Favre’s study shows that our cell phone habit is playing a major role in the current bee holocaust. New iPhone, anyone?
     
  2. Ms.Frizzle

    Ms.Frizzle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We talked about this in one of our classes, the proffesor said their was a bit too much hype on this, as the phone was placed directly in the hive. idk, just something to consider. We also watched a documentary about how it the decline might be because of a parasite that was imported with bees from Austrailia, the effects of bees being used to pollinate one type of crop at a time, pollution in general, and how these several factors lead to a comprimised immune system.
     
  3. Gardengirl 2011

    Gardengirl 2011 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Interesting.
     
  4. dkvart1

    dkvart1 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 5, 2010
    Interesting and I believe that the decline in bees is likely to be a combination of several factors and this one appears to have some merit in the scheme of things. Humans often charge full steam ahead with technology without understanding the hidden and long term effects not only on ourselves, but the environment and animals we share it with.

    Thanks for sharing.
     
  5. Hoss1975

    Hoss1975 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    There is a study at purdue university too that has concluded it may be a combination of several things,one big factor was the nicotine that is used in pesticides.
     
  6. backdoorchicken

    backdoorchicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG] WHATEVER IT IS THEY NEED TO FIGURE IT OUT [​IMG]
     
  7. KristyHall

    KristyHall Overrun With Chickens

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    I Think it is several factors that is causing a decline of bees.
     
  8. aprophet

    aprophet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ms.Frizzle :

    We talked about this in one of our classes, the proffesor said their was a bit too much hype on this, as the phone was placed directly in the hive. idk, just something to consider. We also watched a documentary about how it the decline might be because of a parasite that was imported with bees from Austrailia, the effects of bees being used to pollinate one type of crop at a time, pollution in general, and how these several factors lead to a comprimised immune system.

    it is probably not the individual cell phones but the repeaters that retransmit the signak ie the cell phone towers​
     
  9. aprophet

    aprophet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:more then a little bit of it has to do with homeowners indiscriminately applying pesticides/insecticides and just not knowing the damage it can cause
     
  10. HLAC

    HLAC Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What does a bee need a cell phone for anyhow?

    [​IMG]


    Last summer a bumblee came buzzing along (in a bee-line) and flew right into my leg. Hit hard enough that it bounced off, hit the dirt and had to get up and fly off again. I was weeding so my legs were stationary. I wrote it off to 'texting-while-flying'.


    On a serious note: I have yet to see any one thing that looks like it's the cause of the decline. It seems to be many different things. I see some honeybees here, but not a lot. However, we do have plenty of the native bees which seem to be pollinating things just fine.
     

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