intestines outside of the chicks navel

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by kelsi8281, Sep 16, 2014.

  1. kelsi8281

    kelsi8281 Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 16, 2014
    My chick hatched last night with the yolk not absorbed yet, this morning he is still alive but it looks like the intestines are now coming out of his navel. What can I do to help it? I have it wrapped in a damp paper towel and sitting up in the incubator to see if he will try and absorb it but what if it doesn't?
    Sadly I'm hoping that he will just pass away to get him out of this situation and I don't want to have to do it myself. Is there any way I can save him? Maybe try and push the intestines back in and bandage him up?
    This is my first time hatching eggs and it breaks my heart for the little guy!
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2014
  2. Cowgirl71

    Cowgirl71 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm really sorry, I've been there too. :( I've hatched several hundred chicks and sometimes you'll get one of these. I hated it every time, it's definitely my least favorite part of hatching. You can try pushing it back in and bandaging it up, but it's harder than it looks. I've tried several times and was never able to do it sucessfully. I always ended up putting it down or found it dead to begin with.

    I know it's hard, but you really should put him down. I absolutely hate this part of keeping animals, but if roles were swapped, wouldn't you want to be put out of your misery? I was recently reading a BYC thread about how to best do it. The two favorite ways that were most humane for the chick and least difficult for the human was to hold the chick with one hand over a garbage can or grave, have a pair of scissors in your other hand, put the scissors in position over the chick's neck, close your eyes, and squeeze fast and hard. The other technique involved putting the chick in a dark non-see-through bag and putting that behind the wheel of your car and then back up a foot or two. These both are relatively easy to do but fast for the little chick.
     
  3. kelsi8281

    kelsi8281 Out Of The Brooder

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    I checked him when I got home and he was still alive but had just gotten worse. I took your advice and went with the trash bag idea. I felt horrible doing it but know he's not suffering anymore. I have one more that's trying to hatch so let's hope that one turns out fine and healthy. I don't think I can do that all over again.
     
  4. Cowgirl71

    Cowgirl71 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Kudos for doing that, I know it's not easy. :hugs I really hope this next chick does great for you.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2014
  5. Pinkaboo

    Pinkaboo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    OMG. How awful for you
    I had an assisted hatch chick bleed profusely from its navel yesterday
    I put corn flour and a plaster on it and hoped for the best
    This morning it was very lively and very noisy!

    You did the best thing for the chick, awful for you but very un selfish to put the chick first
    I couldn't of done it, well done and I'm very sorry,
     
  6. kelsi8281

    kelsi8281 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks everyone, I cried the whole time I had to do it. But I know he's not hurting anymore. Crossing my fingers for the next one, hopefully that extra day in the egg let him develop fully.
     
  7. kelsi8281

    kelsi8281 Out Of The Brooder

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    UPDATE: The other chick hatched at about 11 and is perfect. No problems! I'm so happy this one turned out fine!
     
  8. Cowgirl71

    Cowgirl71 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yay! I'm so happy for you! :)
     

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