Intoducing strange ducks to my flock from the SPCA

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by Sinister, Jan 10, 2013.

  1. Sinister

    Sinister Out Of The Brooder

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    The local SPCA's have found a crazy lady in the woods who had over 100 ducks of various breeds. They seized them and now need to find homes for them.

    Some of them are in pretty rough shape because of the lack of care. Most are missing feathers, some show broken limbs that have long healed, that caused them to be lame, but still mostly functional. All were very small and skinny. When I saw them, many seemed to be doing ok considering, and some were obviously laying.

    The SPCA is doing their best, but are overwhelmed and unsure what the future of the animals will be.

    I think I can fit two more girls in my flock without issue, but I am concerned with and diseases the new ducks might bring. How much of an issue is this? I don't really have the space to do a quarantine. I was looking to add some ducks to my flock anyway and its a good opportunity to help some poor ducks out, but I don't want to risk the ones I have.
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2013
  2. cskotek

    cskotek Chillin' With My Peeps

    I would do some sort of quarantine at all cost! I would feed them lots of electrolyte and vitamins to help them along. I would do at least a week quarantine and see how they are. And maybe some blood work before introducing them into your flock :)
     
  3. jdywntr

    jdywntr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    30 day quarantine is the safest way. Many larger or commercial breeders quarantine for 90 days. Because of the conditions these birds were kept in I would not get any unless you can quarantine them. It would be one thing to introduce healthy looking birds where you knew they were cared for but these it would be very risky.
    Sorry but that would be my recommendation. It is great that you are trying to help with some rescues. You could even try to keep them in a garage or shed just away from your flock at first.
     
  4. Miss Lydia

    Miss Lydia Running over with Blessings Premium Member

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    Has the SPCA done any type of health screening besides just food and water? like testing for parasites. blood work?
     
  5. Sinister

    Sinister Out Of The Brooder

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    I just got off the phone with them. They have had a vet come by and look at each single duck and they have been cleared by the vet, but I didnt ask specifics. They apparently have had them for a while, but due to custody issues, thy are just now being made available for adoption. I am going to go out personally in the next few days to check the main flock out. (The ones I saw already are in a splinter flock and are not yet able to be adopted.)



    Here is a website showing some pictures and giving some info on them

    http://woodstocksanctuary.org/2012/09/large-bird-hoarding-case-resolved/
     
  6. Miss Lydia

    Miss Lydia Running over with Blessings Premium Member

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    Just my 2 cents which doesn't amount to much, I would bring them home,last year went to to a farm to pick out 3 Muscovy ducks for our drake, Oh my gosh it upset me so much there is no way i could leave without 3 of them, only went for 2 and I had to pass up 2 beautiful geese too. Broke my heart.. Those girls lived in awful conditions along with all the other Animals and birds there but they were very healthy and came right home and joined our flock. I know it was a gamble not to quarantine but from all I've read waterfowl are very hardy and don't carry diseases like chickens so I wasn't too concerned. Now saying all of that, it is still your decision.
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2013
  7. Going Quackers

    Going Quackers Overrun With Chickens

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    wow, I think it would be worthwhile to go in and not only see the birds in question but to discuss the overall health and condition of the birds now that they have been under care of SPCA.

    ML, has heard the same as I, that waterfowl tend to have less issues with diseases/illness that said, any intro of adult birds is a definite risk. What do you have available to you at home? Ie; your set-up/housing.

    Possible to put up a temp housing situation? I know myself, i wouldn't intro adult birds here.. i could if i HAD to but i prefer the duckling route because i am massively paranoid but i totally understand the desire to help birds in need, i just know you need to ensure you all well versed on what your getting into too.
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2013
  8. jdywntr

    jdywntr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I checked out the link. Someone on BYC posted the link to the youtube video of them swimming for the first time. I would feel much more confident about adopting some since they have been at the shelter for a bit. I would still advise quarantine, just because they are not showing symptoms doesn't mean that they aren't carrying an illness that your birds haven't been exposed to.

    I would get specifics about if the vet just did physicals (this is what I'm thinking was done) or if they did more extensive testing.
     
  9. cskotek

    cskotek Chillin' With My Peeps

    I have plently of rescues. My sucess one is a big white male scovie... And man he was in horrible conditions and he himself was horrible! He looks great now! He molted all his nasty feathers and is super soft! He now has a lady friend that he and her do a dance every morning lol! It was sooo worth it.
     
  10. destinduck

    destinduck obsessed with "ducks"

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    I agree with jdywntr. At the very least keep them in quarantine for a while if you get some .Do things like look at the stool they have and make sure to feel the breast of the birds you do go to get for good weight. Also check their feet and dont get any bumblefoot ones. I have dealt with bumblefoot only a few times and even though I did what I could for it. The birds still died in a year or so wether it was bumble or not. But to me personally it's a time release death sentence and I dont want to deal with that if I can help it. I think all in all youll be okay if you check them out the best you can Good luck
     

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