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Introducing new birds to different pens

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by kssilkiemama, Mar 5, 2016.

  1. kssilkiemama

    kssilkiemama Out Of The Brooder

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    Ok...So I have another question... I have birds that are free run in pens within my chicken house but I want to change their pens and add them to others... My question is, when I do, they seem to fight for a while so do you let them fight it out or not introduce them? I am trying to pair everyone up but I have a white hen that when I put new hens in with her and the rooster, she chases them in the pen. The pen is 4'X6'X6'. Has wood chips and a brick floor so no wire pens for them. Thank you in advance!
     
  2. Chicken Egg 17

    Chicken Egg 17 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well u should let them fight and work it out them selves unless there is bleeding or they injured or hurt but u want to keep and eye on them when u try to put them together
     
  3. azygous

    azygous Overrun With Chickens

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    You do know, don't you, that you upset the social order each time you put new birds into a different pen? The different temperaments involved will determine how much conflict will result. But do expect some conflict until a new order is established.

    You can minimize the conflict with adequate space. Also it helps to have "furniture" in the run for new birds to take refuge on, under, and behind. Stumps, an old chair, additional perches all help.

    Be aware that new birds inserted into a pen will probably be chased away from the food. You need to takes steps to insure the transplanted birds are getting adequate nourishment. Do this by examining the crops at roosting time. You'll know from a flat crop that you will need to feed that one separately until it gains enough self confidence to fight its way to the feeder.

    I wrote an article about this subject, linked below. Just scroll down to my signature window and click on the third link.
     
  4. Johnhutch

    Johnhutch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm also at the point of incorporating new chicks to the crew an what I did was build a box covered with chicken wire on 3 sides and left an opening on one side, the open side sits against the wall so the bigger ones can get in. Right now everyone is curious and the older ones sit next to them an just stare as my little guys go about their way trying to adjust and figure out what's the new stuff they feel under their feet and all the different noises they now hear, I'm hoping in a week or so I can let them mingle and see how that goes...
     
  5. Johnhutch

    Johnhutch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Here's what I did..
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. kssilkiemama

    kssilkiemama Out Of The Brooder

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    They all have been together in one big house loose for the winter but I am trying to separate them into pens for breeding.
     
  7. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted

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    4x6 is pretty small. How many birds are you trying to house in that? Full grown large fowl, I'd not put more than a trio, and that would only be for a short term breeding pen. If you have a hen who doesn't confine well with others, you may need to just pair her with the desired rooster and no other hens for a short period of time to collect her eggs.
     
  8. kssilkiemama

    kssilkiemama Out Of The Brooder

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    I measured them last night and they are actually 5x6x6 pens. So that is 40 square feet and i have read where bantams need 2' per bird is that correct?
     
  9. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted

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    Some bantams may be able to get by with that small a space, but apparently your white hen is telling you she can't tolerate that. Just like some humans can live in closer quarters with others, and some of us need to be able to have more personal space. That's why numbers are only a guideline, you have to listen to your birds. If this particular hen needs more space, you're going to have to accommodate her or have other birds be pretty beat up.
     
  10. Johnhutch

    Johnhutch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ok so it's been a week now that these trio have been sharing the coop. My little red one somehow escaped and was hanging with the big girls, so today I let them all mingle while I supervised, my RIR just wanted to peck them an pick on them which started the others to follot suit, so I showed the little ones how to escape an go back to their safe area, once they did that they didn't want to come out of thier haven. I'm going to try again tomorrow an see what occurs.
     

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