Introducing new birds to flock

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by bizzynik, Apr 22, 2017.

  1. bizzynik

    bizzynik Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 21, 2017
    Kentucky
    I recently lost one of my roosters and a hen. Being that my flock is still very young, roughly 8 weeks old, and I now only have one rooster and 11 hens, I went ahead and replaced the lost birds. The rooster and hens I purchased are the same age as my flock. When they were introduced everyone seems to get along pretty well. There was some little tufts, but nothing I wasn't expecting. Right now there are still two groups, the old and the new. It's only been a couple of days, so I'm not worried. I was just wondering roughly how long before they are more like one group. This is my first flock, and so I guess I'm just anxious for everyone to gel. Thanks for any advice.
     
  2. Garden-fed Chic

    Garden-fed Chic New Egg

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    Apr 22, 2017
    Ridgecrest, Ca
    not sure i understand? you have one rooster and 11 hens and you added another rooster and another hen to replace the lost ones? Two roosters don't tend to get along with not enough hens...another 9-13 hens to give you 10-12 per rooster...and this only if you have enough space for them to stay out of each others way. If I'm misunderstanding you and the 1 to 11 is after the replacement, then all is well and they will be his at least by the time he and they are old enough to be mated. If they're getting along, they have already been introduced. Relationships take time, even with chickens.
     
  3. bizzynik

    bizzynik Out Of The Brooder

    56
    17
    44
    Apr 21, 2017
    Kentucky
     
  4. bizzynik

    bizzynik Out Of The Brooder

    56
    17
    44
    Apr 21, 2017
    Kentucky

    Before I had lost the two, I had 12 hens and 2 roosters. I recently added one rooster and 3 hens to replace the 2 birds I lost. So now I have 14 hens and 2 roosters. I was told that in a free range environment you need a ratio of 1 rooster to 6 hens. Which is why I replaced the rooster that I lost. I also got some hens from the same lady so that he wouldn't be the lone man in the flock. I know they are young to free range, and we've only been letting them out for a hour or so at a time.
     
  5. Garden-fed Chic

    Garden-fed Chic New Egg

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    Apr 22, 2017
    Ridgecrest, Ca
    If they're free-ranging, two roosters may work for you, but as they get older, one may end of getting hurt, especially if they spend time in a caged environment without space to retreat. I've never heard that free ranging lowers the hen ratio to six? Could be true, or it could be that someone had a rooster they needed to unload? I've had roosters together while they're young, but they eventually mature and one has to be removed when couped with hens. I did have three roosters penned together that grew up together, but they were fine after they were mature and fought it out in open space to establish dominance, but they were not couped with hens. I would either increase the hens to a 10-12 per rooster ratio or find a home for the extra rooster...it could work out for you if they have enough space so the less dominant roo can get away when they mature, but it's not the norm.
     

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