Introducing new chicks to a year old flock

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by bluebarn, Feb 27, 2016.

  1. bluebarn

    bluebarn New Egg

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    Apr 11, 2015
    I lost two chickens to a hawk and got two new chicks from the farm I work at. My flock is mixed, hens only and a free range group of six. Any suggestions on when and how to introduce my new
    Ladies? They are currently a week old. Thanks!
     
  2. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Let It Snow Premium Member

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    when your chicks no longer need extra heat and are okay with your outside temperatures, around 8-10 weeks they should be moved into a separation pen inside your coop where your hens can see them, after about a week or two let them start to mingle with the adults with supervision. Return them to their pen when you can't keep an eye on them until you feel comfortable leaving them out. I like to put mine back into their own pen for a while at night.
     
  3. bluebarn

    bluebarn New Egg

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    Apr 11, 2015
    Thanks! So I only have one run and one coop- my hens free range all day- morn to evening should I get another coop?
     
  4. bluebarn

    bluebarn New Egg

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    Apr 11, 2015
    do you mean place a small pen inside the coop? Like a dog crate? Then let them free range with the group all day?
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2016
  5. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Let It Snow Premium Member

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    Usually I put together a small wire pen. If your coop is small you might have to put them in the run during the day than back somewhere else safe at night, or lock them in the run so the older ones can see them through the wire. I will also lock mine inside the coop for a few hours for them to become familiar with it.
     
  6. azygous

    azygous True BYC Addict

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    I utilize the "panic room" method of integrating chicks. It makes it safe for them to mingle with the adults because they have a safe place to retreat to that the adults can't reach them. You can read about it and see pictures by reading the article I wrote on it linked below, the second one of the three.
     
  7. bluebarn

    bluebarn New Egg

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    Thanks!
     
  8. lesat409

    lesat409 Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 23, 2014
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    My two new chicks (about 8 weeks old) have been staying in a cage in the coop for about 2 weeks now. I had it set up like a panic room for them, but found out that one of my older hens is aggressive and can still get in and she chases and bullies the youngers. For today I have locked the big girls out of the coop (which is where they lay their eggs) since I had to rescue one of the youngers - she managed to squeeze her head through a hole and was unable to get out without my assistance. How do I move forward? Will they ever get along? Thanks for any advice.
     
  9. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Let It Snow Premium Member

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    I personally start by penning them separately but within sight, which you have done, then I begin mingling with supervision, the first time can last minutes, when things get rough or everyone has had enough everyone gets rounded back up and securely kept separate. I Wil keep doing this for the next week, depending on how much time I have in a day, whether it's once a day or multiple times. As you have seen some hens will want to be a bit more aggressive, I try to let them express that somewhat to get it out of their system but not enough to harm anyone. The key for me is if it gets rough put the kids back to their safe place and keep trying, eventually everyone calms down and can tolerate each other.
     
  10. lesat409

    lesat409 Out Of The Brooder

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    THanks! I will keep trying and be patient.
     

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