Is a spray can of Lysol good enough to disinfect a used coop?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by BeastyBird, Oct 25, 2016.

  1. BeastyBird

    BeastyBird Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 13, 2015
    I got myself a little used coop and run off Craigslist, it is a small factory brand one used just a few months to grow out some chicks, the entire length is just 4 feet. It came to me power washed and I just emptied an entire can of Lysol on it every square inch of wood and wire inside and out, is that good enough to be sure I killed any diseases or should I get me some bleach in the morning?
     
  2. cavemanrich

    cavemanrich Overrun With Chickens

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    Melrose Park Illinois
    Most likely good enough. I would have opted for bleach right off the start. Bleach is cheap and a real killer. Is there any reason you suspect some kind of disease??? or just being cautious? BETTER SAFE THAN SORRY for sure. [​IMG]

    WISHING YOU BEST. [​IMG]
     
  3. BurntFeather

    BurntFeather Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 7, 2015
    many people suggest using vinegar as a substitute for bleach.
    I am going to give a clean up we follow every spring because I do not know what condition the coop or the chickens living where in prior to it being power washed and sold to you...
    1. Shovel and scrape all of the manure, dirt, shavings, cobwebs, and feathers out. It’s important to be thorough in this step, since the vinegar will not exactly vaporize the actual particles of manure, etc. I found a square shovel to be incredibly handy in scraping the floor. Old, dried chicken manure can be like cement…
    2. Take a hose to it. Give the walls, floors, roosts, and nesting boxes a good spray down to remove the fine dust and soften any stuck-on manure or dirt.
    3. Scrape & shovel again. Do a final sweeping/scraping of any remaining, softened manure or dirt, then allow the water to drain, or sweep it out the door.
    4. Scrub! Mix up equal parts white vinegar and water in a bucket OR just slosh straight vinegar.Take your brush and give everything a vigorous scrubbing, making sure to distribute the vinegar solution as thoroughly as possible.
    5. One more rinse…
    6. Open up the doors and windows to let everything to dry and air out. Sunlight also acts as a disinfectant, plus, fresh air is always beneficial. I like to have plenty of ventilation in my coop.
    7. While you have the hose hooked up, scrub any feeders and water containers and set them in the sun to dry.
    http://www.theprairiehomestead.com/2011/03/naturally-disinfecting-the-chicken-coop.html


     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2016
  4. BeastyBird

    BeastyBird Out Of The Brooder

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    I am just being careful :)
    It came to me power washed and very clean, not a speck of grime, I would have said it looks brand new if not for discoloring where parts meet the ground... buuut I never saw her chickens so who knows what was in it!

    I rely on Lysol for my quarantine procedures (spray my shoes and myself like crazy after doing anything in or even near quarantine) so I figured it was enough to prep the coop.



    PS from what I understand Lysol kills everything but Marek's??? A fellow crazy chicken lady I visited told me such (we both require backyard visitors to spray their shoes with it)
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2016
  5. BeastyBird

    BeastyBird Out Of The Brooder

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    conclusion: use bleach, coop came with mites D8<
    Noticed them 3 days into using it, luckily it was not near my big coop and I could quarantine the 3 chickens I put in it and treat them for bugs.
    The coop and entire area was sprayed with Sevin hose attachment yard spray, then put out front and dusted in Sevin powder and it will stay there for 8 months until any surviving ******** starve to death.
     

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