Is anyone else against spaldings.

Discussion in 'Peafowl' started by SuperPeacockman, Mar 22, 2011.

  1. SuperPeacockman

    SuperPeacockman Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I just wanted to know if anyone else was against breeding spaldings. I am because they impurify the thin green gene pool.
     
  2. Steve_of_sandspoultry

    Steve_of_sandspoultry Overrun With Chickens

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    Last edited: Jul 22, 2011
  3. MinxFox

    MinxFox Overrun With Chickens

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    It all depends on if you are responsible. I am okay with spaldings as long as people raise them responsibly. If you have spaldings that look like greens PLEASE don't sell them as greens so you can get more money for them!!! Then I could see that being the problem because a person who might want to "help" keep the greens going strong could get these green looking spaldings possibly breeding them to real greens therefore not getting pure chicks and then sell the offspring and then you have a domino effect...I am not sure if that is totally how it works, but that is sorta what I think might happen in some cases. As long as you keep them separate and know your spaldings vs. greens then I think it is okay. The problem is when you have people that don't know the difference.

    Now some things I have read state that over in Asia were the green peafowl lives the introduction of spaldings could be seen as a problem, but then something else I read was about blues and greens naturally crossing in the wild and there being a wild spalding somewere in the mountains isolated from both green and blue peafowl...Not sure if that is for real but it could be possible.

    In other words I don't think spaldings are bad and are muts or anything. I do however think that green peafowl should not be wasted only matting to spaldings and that greens should mainly be matted with greens to keep a lot of green peafowl and not waste a good green on a spalding.

    Not sure if I made since there but yeah.[​IMG]
     
  4. SuperPeacockman

    SuperPeacockman Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:That is what I meant.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2011
  5. MinxFox

    MinxFox Overrun With Chickens

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    Okay so I understood the topic, hooray! It makes me sick finding a peafowl website with a peafowl that is obviously a spalding and them calling it a Java. "Pure Java look at that green coming in" and all that stuff uh I guess they just don't know but it doesn't take too much google picture search to find what a real green should look like and a visit to Wolfgang Mennig's website to realize the peafowl you are calling a Java really is not one. I hate it for the people on here that have had those bad experiences were their first green peafowl were actually really nice emerald spaldings and they paid for greens. It just isn't right.
     
  6. deerman

    deerman Rest in Peace 1949-2012

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    Myself i think if you want green breed green, only reason i see for spalding is to put a new color or pattern to the frame of the greens, like white spaldings, pieds, and etc

    I would never breed a spalding just to get a green spalding.

    There are enought green spalding ,just trying to add the colors, as not all are split.

    So to breed a green spalding to green spalding to get more green spalding, is crazy because they DON'T breed true.
     
  7. AquaEyes

    AquaEyes Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Deerman, how much variation do you find within clutches of spaldings? Does the variation decrease with higher green percentages as compared to 50% spaldings? I was always curious about this. I understand the reasons behind them not breeding true, but I wondered if the higher percentages were closer to "true breeding" than the lower percentages. I must say, however, that the first generation 50% spaldings with no mutation are a gorgeous teal color. Too bad that teal color doesn't breed true. I think I'd like that more than the really high percentage spaldings that look almost like pure greens. But since my original draw to peafowl was being able to have them free range, I guess the spaldings are out of the question anyway.

    :)

    ~Chris
     
  8. deerman

    deerman Rest in Peace 1949-2012

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    I breed very few spalding, not real sure ,but 50% the variation is alot.

    I was adding the spalding to charcoal ,in hopes the green blood would get the charcoal hens to lay.

    I do like the spalding in new color, and even green/blue spalding. Just wouldn't breed for them.


    Sure the spalding could be free range, but pure greens cost alot to try IMO.


    Anyway crossing the green and blue ,you should have a goal. No reason to do it just to get spalding.......alot and lots out there now,

    A f1 peacock train , does have a nice color compare to a blue.

    Yes the spalding are the mutts of the peafowl.

    The green does darken the colors also, saw a grand spalding blackshoulder bronze...over 50%

    Plus have not raise any greens, my highest was a 75% spalding split opal, which look more like a 50% spalding.


    One thing you can buy low % spalding for the price of normal blues....so go for free range.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2011
  9. TV

    TV Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I say breed what you want as long as you do not misrepresent what you have or create. A Spaulding will always be a Spaulding no matter what it looks like. I personally enjoy the offspring of Spaulding/Spaulding breeding because of the

    variableness of the outcome. You often have color that does not show in either of the others. If you just want a beautiful pet that is eye candy for the yard, I see no harm. As for being mutts, well that may be so but it seems like a rather

    harsh and derogatory term for such beautiful animals. I was once severely chastised on this forum for using the term to describe the mixing of the different subspecies of Greens and then selling them as "Pure Greens"; a practice that seems

    to me to have much more potential for harm to their purity than breeding Spaulding to Spaulding. Personally I have yet to see an ugly peacock no matter what its genetic heritage. Some of us let our peafowl breed for no other goal than the

    pure joy those tiny babies bring us each spring and the anticipation of what they will look like when they mature. I think we should all be more tolerant of what we all do as long as we’re honest in the representation of what we have.
     
  10. texascowboy1979

    texascowboy1979 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Well said on entire reply.

    I breed spauldings...

    They are great birds... LOVE THEM. I agree with your "I say breed what you want as long as you do not misrepresent what you have or create." They sure are wonderful EYE candy for the yard.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2011

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