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Is Broodiness contagious????

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Desert Rooster, Apr 1, 2011.

  1. Desert Rooster

    Desert Rooster El Gallo Del Desierto

    Sep 4, 2010
    Hesperia, Ca
    Dealing with my 3rd broody this year [​IMG] , It all started with my Cuckoo Marans mix hen going broody in February, i was able to snap her out of it, then my Silkie went broody for about one week then snapped out of it two weeks ago, and now my Black Star is showing signs of broodiness.
    Is Broodiness contagious????
     
  2. karlamaria

    karlamaria Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 30, 2011
    Western montana
    , if a new chick is definitely not in your plans, or your hen's eggs cannot be fertile, then you do need to try and discourage broodiness within your flock. Once one hen becomes broody, it can be quite contagious! Regular egg collections are important but may not "crack" the problem. Broodiness can be subtle at first - keep a close eye for any hen that is starting to spend longer periods in the nesting boxes. She may start to become a little temperamental and take exception, in the form a well place peck, to your presence. You may even notice that she plucks out a few of her breast feathers to make a comfy nest!

    Hen & chicksTo discourage your broody hen from brooding anymore than she already is, blocking off the nesting box or simply just moving her off the nest and removing the eggs may be all you need to do. However, some hen's instincts are very strong and you may need to remove the hen to temporary accommodation in a cooler place for a few days.

    The change of environment and conditions should soon take her mind off sitting on eggs all day. Don't delay in trying to break the broodiness within your hen. The longer you allow it to continue, the longer you will have to wait before she starts laying eggs again and earning her keep!
     
  3. zazouse

    zazouse Overrun With Chickens

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    Sep 7, 2009
    Southeast texas
    I do believe it is.
    I have hens sitting everywhere , some nest i found have as many as 4 hens sitting together ,i have 17 in the egg laying area,ikeep taking the eggs and they just keep sitting,i have 2 geese sitting in my green house along with 2 silkie hens and there are more elsewhere . [​IMG]

    I like hatcing my own eggs so having all these broodies is a pain in the but.
     
  4. Urbanfarmerkc

    Urbanfarmerkc Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 10, 2010
    Raytown, MO (BY KCMO)
    Funny, I was just thinking that myself. I have set eggs under 3 hens this week. I noticed one clucking today which means she'll probably be next. Oh well, I don't mind it but I do think if one goes there are several who will want to follow...

    Dave
     
  5. shellyga

    shellyga Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 23, 2010
    Milner
    My first ever broody hen hatched her clutch on the 16th. I noticed the sounds she made when she would make the ultra rare trips to the food/water - the clucking and puffed up feathers. I have another showing signs of the same clucking and puffed up feathers - caught her on the nest late afternoon/early evening yesterday but she did finally move off and roost as normal. I feel sorry for this hen as she seems to be the main "target" for my alpha roo and the young roo that is just starting to mount. She gets sooo mad at the young roo - chasing him after he jumps her. So IF she is not going broody - I can not blame her for hiding out in the nest boxes. If she is broody - 21 days will be a nice rest.

    Shelly
     
  6. Urbanfarmerkc

    Urbanfarmerkc Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 10, 2010
    Raytown, MO (BY KCMO)
    Quote:Well, 21 days plus a month or two for raising them. There does seem to be a status change after the chicks are grown for the mother hen. The bottom girls often take a more prominent position in the flock.
     

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