Is candling really necessary?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Ttedoldi, Feb 20, 2015.

  1. Ttedoldi

    Ttedoldi Out Of The Brooder

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    Hello, I´ve had chickens before but this is the first time that I´ve ever incubated some fertile eggs and attempted to hatch them at home. My eggs have been in the incubator now for 10 days but I´ve resisted candling them because I´m worried about interrupting the incubation process and accidentally damaging the eggs. Do I really need to candle them or is it ok to leave them undisturbed? Thanks!
     
  2. HEChicken

    HEChicken Overrun With Chickens

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    No need to candle at all! Some people like to, just because watching a fetus moving around an egg is fun. And sometimes people like to know which eggs are not developing so they can remove them and free up space in the incubator to add more. But there is no requirement to candle if you don't want to.
     
  3. Ttedoldi

    Ttedoldi Out Of The Brooder

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    Oh good, thank you! I didn´t want to do the wrong thing by not candling them - I think I´ll just leave them be then [​IMG]
     
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  4. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    My personal opinion, they should at least be candled at the 3 recommended days to check the air cells for proper growth and to check for any blood rings/clears so that they can be removed. While a lot of people prefer minimal candling, I depend on candling to know that I am on the right track. If my air cells are growing too big too fast I can catch this, fix my humidity and possibly save myself the frustration of shrink wrapped chicks at hatch. Or if my air cells are too small I can decrease my humidity so that they will loose moisture and not drown at hatch. Also candling and keeping track of growth of the embryo can give you an idea if they are growing properly which can key you into whether your temperature is adequate.

    There are other's that look at it the same as you and don't candle more than a couple times if at all. It's not my philosophy. I am also a candling addict, so....lol My last hatch was 13/16. I have never damaged an egg as I take every precaution. I wash my hands before touching them, I'm gentle and I don't keep them out too long. I think you benefit from at least the day 10/14/18 candling and comparing to the chart. That's my opinion on it. (Plus it's just too cool not to see the growth of your eggs periodically.)
     
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  5. scflock

    scflock Overrun With Chickens

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    Candling isn't necessary, but it doesn't hurt the eggs, either. I can candle 24 eggs in less time than it takes my broody hen to hop off the nest and eat. If you are concerned for space during hatching, or just want to remove infertile or undeveloping eggs, then candling will show you that. Some people just like to watch the development. Personally, I only candle at lockdown and remove the undeveloped eggs for the extra space during hatching. Not removing them won't hurt, unless they have a foul odor, they just won't hatch. If you don't want to candle, and nothing is smelling in the incubator, then you don't have to candle at all. If you do want to candle, just to see what is going on, you won't hurt them
     
  6. Ttedoldi

    Ttedoldi Out Of The Brooder

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    Ah, yes I see your point about regulating humidity to help, plus it would be really cool to see how they develop. Thanks for the advice
     
  7. Ttedoldi

    Ttedoldi Out Of The Brooder

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    wow, I hope to be as fast as you one day! The eggs smell fine so no problems there, I may give it a try with a few and see how it goes. As its my first time am being extra cautious. Thanks for responding
     
  8. Strader

    Strader Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Totally agree its cool to see a few progressing in shell especially if kids are around, but I never candle anymore. If temps are correct and humidity is correct, then finding ones that are not developing wont change the fact you were going to loose a few anyway. For me I wouldn't want to add eggs to replace eggs that I found as bad anyway. This means different hatch times and confusion when incubator door/ lid shouldn't be opened. Also would probably end up with having to create separations in brooder if ages are more than 4 or 5 days apart. For me just easier to do a hatch then start another. Some do want to create room for more eggs as they have small incubators. Mine holds 164 eggs so I guess I don't worry about it if a few don't hatch.
    Also have never candled to find bad eggs because I was worried about an "exploding egg". I have never had an egg explode and have let eggs stay in incubator for 29 days. I've also hatched eggs I've had for 13 days before adding them to incubator.
     
  9. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    I totally agree with the staggered hatches!! Definitely not for me either! I came close to having an egg explode and probably would not have noticed if I hadn't opened the bator to candle. The membrane was so thick that luckily it held it together until I got it out and took it outside. This is what it looked like:

    [​IMG]

    I thought for sure it would bust trying to get it out, but it didn't.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Ttedoldi

    Ttedoldi Out Of The Brooder

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    I must admit it was the horror stories on the internet about exploding eggs that had me most worried. I guess its a matter of experience - this may be my first lot of eggs but I´m already addicted so hopefully I´ll be a pro at this one day!
     

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