Is Crossbeak genetic or environmental or ????

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by SusanJoM, Aug 7, 2008.

  1. SusanJoM

    SusanJoM Chillin' With My Peeps

    I have a lovely blue Ameraucana cockerel developing. He's pretty spunky, and manages to get the extra time he needs at the feeder to keep himself well enough fed. BUT, is this something that might carry over into his progeny?

    Let me know before I get too attached to him, please.

    Thanks

    Susan
     
  2. lurky

    lurky Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 4, 2007
    Western MA
    I can't answer all your questions, but I suspect that some issues might come as a result of hatching small eggs that don't allow enough room for development. its just a thought [​IMG]
     
  3. Cuban Longtails

    Cuban Longtails Flock Mistress

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    Sep 20, 2007
    Northeast Texas
    All of the above. It's never good to use them in breeding programs because it is a genetic defect. If he wasn't born with it, but it developed later then it's probably hereditary from somewhere down the line. Crossbeak (in chickens), from what I've researched, happens when part of the skull doesn't develop correctly.

    If he was crossbeaked at hatch, it was likely something that happend during incubation or shipping.

    He may have a hard time mating properly because he won't be able to "hold" the hen, which could also be a reason they're not used in breeding programs.
     
  4. lurky

    lurky Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 4, 2007
    Western MA
    I'm hoping mine has a hard time crowing [​IMG]
     
  5. SusanJoM

    SusanJoM Chillin' With My Peeps

    [​IMG]

    Susan
     

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