Is it a hawk or something else?

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by Sabrinainmiss, May 30, 2007.

  1. Sabrinainmiss

    Sabrinainmiss Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 23, 2007
    Gothenburg, Nebraska
    O.K. enough is a enough. I had 12 baby roos (now about 12 weeks old), given to me and have 6 laying hens and 4 juvinile hens. I started letting them free range a few weeks ago. I let them outof their enclosed run around 4 p.m. and back in around 7 p.m. Well last week two of my liitle roos came up missing, I searched and called and finally one came running, scared to death. Never found the other. Today I noticed around 6p.m. all the little roos in the coop except one is missing, the others run scared when a crow crows. The older hens do not seem to be bothered at all and stay out. Do you think it is a hawk or what? I live on 10 acres and there are lots of woods around. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2007
  2. Whirlwind

    Whirlwind Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 14, 2007
    Tuttle, Oklahoma
    Could be but is is so hard to tell unless you see culprit in the act. I have lost 2 hens and only know for sure on the last as I caught hawk in the act. We have woods and a creek {lots of predators}. Probably were scared if they were in the coop early. They need lots of stuff to hid under, shrubs, bushes, ect. I kind of think if it was a hawk your hens would of been spooked too. As mine were both fully grown.

    Alas, this is what happens sometimes when you free range.
     
  3. chicknmania

    chicknmania Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Jan 26, 2007
    central Ohio
    Usually if it is a hawk you will see it hanging around over the next couple of days. You can often discourage them by firing bird bombs, or bottle rockets at them, or just by keeping your chickens confined for a week or so. fyi, it is against Federal law to kill a hawk or owl.
     
  4. CoyoteMagic

    CoyoteMagic RIP ?-2014

    Quote:May I add, it is against the law to kill any Bird of Prey (hawks, eagles, and those ugly vultures) or Song Birds. It is also against the law to possess any feathers, egg, or nest of these birds. (I'm in trouble I've got bunches of bird feathers I have found on the ground) Even Native Americans must have special permissions to possess Eagle feathers and wings for ceremonial purposes. Most of the feathers you see on their regallia is of some kind of poultry, mostly chickens and turkeys!!

    The only "Song Birds" you are permitted to kill are Starlings and House Finches as they are considered nuisances (sp?) They are not native to the US and have wreck havoc on the native bird species by taking over their nestboxes and killing their young.
     
  5. Sabrinainmiss

    Sabrinainmiss Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 23, 2007
    Gothenburg, Nebraska
    Well caught it red handed it was a hawk pickedup another baby today right in front of me!!! I guess that means nobody will get out of the run. Will a hawk take chickens that are larger? Should I keep them all in or just the 14 week olds?
     
  6. Whirlwind

    Whirlwind Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 14, 2007
    Tuttle, Oklahoma
    Sorry about losing another chick. Both of mine were fully grown hens. I don't let mine out every day now. And when I do I try to keep a eye on them. I would not let them out for a few days for sure.
     
  7. justusnak

    justusnak Flock Mistress

    Definately keep them all in. It will take a small one when possible, but if need be, will take a larger one. I would keep them in the run, and covered for about a week. Let the hawk find dinner elsewhere.
     
  8. Sabrinainmiss

    Sabrinainmiss Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 23, 2007
    Gothenburg, Nebraska
    Thanks I will their run is completely covered with a tin roof and will be safe there. I am missing ajuvinile RIR also, don't know if scared and hiding or if it got it also.[​IMG]
     
  9. mlheran

    mlheran Chillin' With My Peeps

    A couple years ago I saw a weird sight. Our property is lined with huge Eucalyptus trees on the windward side, and they are prime habitat for Great Horned Owls and Red Tailed Hawks. I've always respected and enjoyed seeing those big birds swooping around, and up until this incident I never saw them catch or eat anything bigger than a Jack Rabbit (their usual prey).

    Well one day I was watching a grown hawk in the trees and I thought it was sitting really wierd -it seemed like it's legs were hanging below the branch and it was resting on it's stomach. So I got out the binoculars and saw that it was actually sitting on a full-grown chicken! I never found out where it caught it -only a couple neighbors at that time had chickens, and the poultry farm down the road is completely housed. But I was amazed!

    So yes, I would say that a hawk or owl could manage to take a full-grown chicken. Probably not a heavy breed -or a roo- but definitely a Leghorn or something similar. Sounds like a good idea to keep them in the run, whether they like it or not. [​IMG]
     
  10. JudyMcKinn

    JudyMcKinn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 24, 2007
    SW MO
    In my opinion the 3 hour free ranging isn't worth it, losing so many. and the hawk may get a little discouraged if you keep them in a week or so, but it won't take him long to learn when you DO let them out again. I believe they have a territory, so he would probably be checking the area pretty often, even if the chickens are in. and they will grab them right in front of you, practically, when they learn where the meal is. Having shrubs to run under, etc, does help, but I have had a hawk land and walk under a shrub, also, and get the chicken hiding there.
     

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