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Is it Bumblefoot?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by JokerAlpha, Mar 19, 2015.

  1. JokerAlpha

    JokerAlpha New Egg

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    Hi, my name is Joseph and I am wondering if this is bumble foot or is it early signs of bumble foot. We have had a really wet winter and I am just getting around to tending to our 11 hens and 1 roosters feet. One hen was found to be clear of bumble foot. As for the others, 1 had a scab on her foot. At first glance it looked like a thorn but it actually was a elongated scale. I clipped the scale it but I am wondering if it is early signs of bumble foot. When I cleaned it out the scales are left with this yellow stain.

    1.
    .[​IMG]

    For the other 10, they seem to have a soft pinkish spot like the picture below.

    2.
    [​IMG]

    After cleaning our flock, I used Vetericyn spray and saturated all of their feet.

    Are these are early signs of bumblefeet? If so what can I do to stop it from getting progressively worse?



    Thank you in advance and I apologize for the blurred photos.



    ~Joseph
     
  2. Ravynscroft

    Ravynscroft For the Love of Duck Premium Member

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    Chickens don't have scales on the bottoms of their feet, so I think that might be bumblefoot... and in 1st pic that foot looks swollen or has something stuck in it, I would soak it in warm water with epsom salts if you have it, and see if you can very gently work anything out of that spot...

    What are their perches like? If they are small around, or have excess poop buildup, that might cause it... use 2x4's with the flatter side up so they roost flat footed... hope this helps and good luck!
     
  3. JokerAlpha

    JokerAlpha New Egg

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    May 17, 2014
    Ravyn Thank you for the quick reply! I have had my flock for almost 2 years and this is actually my first flock. So just to verify, in Picture 1, I need to take a closer look and apply the aid. As for Picture 2, it is bumble foot and that I need to better their perch and conduct an excess poop reduction where I can. They have a 2x4 perch and they are not terribly caked with poop. However, we have a sand litter tray, and they have been perching themselves on the rim of the tray(Tray walls are 3/8" thick, I will most likely fix this). The tray sits 3 feet off the floor of their coop. Would excessive jumping cause Bumblefeet? Just another thought, should I lower tray? Secondly, in the coop I started on the deep litter method and I feel like this is not the way to go.Since its the onset of bumblefoot, I feel like should discontinue deep litter. I have seen some videos of later stages of bumble foot and I hope I don't have to cut into their feet just yet. But in doing perch improvements and a bit of poop reduction; I can hope for the best yea?

    Thanks for the reply! I will post an update on their progress. Will welcome more comments.

    Joseph
     
  4. Ravynscroft

    Ravynscroft For the Love of Duck Premium Member

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    Middle Tennessee
    Glad to help, Joseph!

    Pic 1 does look like it, pic 2 actually just looks like the skin is irritated, and that makes sense if they are perching on the tray. Good job on the perches! Yes, I would lower the tray, anything to keep them from perching on it, maybe put it directly on the floor? Chickens tend to go for higher perches so that should get them off the tray.

    Bumblefoot is caused by either a cut or a foreign object getting stuck (then embedding) in the foot, leading to infection and buildup of hard material. It could have been any of a number of things that caused it in 1 hen, so don't freak out, you are doing fine.

    Deep litter is fine as long as it gets turned often and fresh gets added. If there are lots of hard chunks you might just sift those out with a rake.

    Hope you don't have to cut into it either, but I think you caught it early.

    And yes, I think you'll be good to go if you get the tray moved and scrape the perches. Remember, they are almost always on their feet so what might not bother us could bother them. Good luck and post updates, please!
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2015
  5. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    In the first pic, I dont see the telltale dark scab indicating possible bumblefoot. Additionally there isnt really enough swelling nor redness that I can see to do surgery on the footpad. Dont unnecessarily conduct surgery, you may not find infection once you get in there and start digging around. Sometimes these things go away in their own, I've had it happen and needlessly conducted surgery causing stress for the bird. When you see redness and swelling with a scab, that's when you should conduct surgery. For now, just observe her for any signs of limping or pick her up once a week or so and check the bottom of her foot for redness or swelling. Heavy breeds are more likely to get bumblefoot, lowering roosts will help prevent it. Use sandpaper to smooth roosts clearing burrs and splinters, a few swipes with the sandpaper will take care of it. Any high places in your pen/run or yard where they can jump down from should be lowered or eliminated as best as you can.
    I dont see anything wrong in the second pic, the feet look normal.
    As far as the deep litter method goes, it's up to you whether or not to do it. Our winters down here in southeast Georgia and Florida arnt cold like up north and summers are very hot and very humid. Deep litter is known to be a hotbed for capillary worms eggs and cockroaches down here where keeping everything as dry as possible is key, with proper ventilation to prevent mold and fungus as well.
     

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