Is it common for a rooster to be "slow" with the semantics of mating?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by GoldnCornerBrds, Nov 20, 2014.

  1. GoldnCornerBrds

    GoldnCornerBrds Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 7, 2014
    USA
    Hello, I'm learning about roosters through having hatched out pretty much ALL roosters this past spring and have a few questions... Any suggestions or experience is appreciated :)

    I have a 2 year old Silkie rooster who had been fine with 15 hens until he attacked one of the more dominant older hens and scalped her basically. It was awful. She has recovered and I have seperated him, but I noticed that before when he would try and mate a hen, he'd just stand on their backs for a couple of MINUTES after doing the deed and just peck them a few times in the head. The only reason he would get off of them was because I'd throw my hands up and spook him off their backs. It is the strangest thing. It's like he doesn't know why they aren't moving. Is this normal? Or is he just an abnormally unintelligent rooster? Also is it normal for a rooster to attack one hen so gruesomely? I'm worried about adding a rooster ever again. I know the attacked and nearly beheaded hen is a hen. He never has been mean to me or any of the other hens, just one poor little EE hen.

    Another question.... Can you keep 7 roosters (youngish-4 to 5 months old) together in their own bachelor pen without any issues? They were raised all together and are familiar with each other, but I'm wondering how long will they keep the peace? I also have just recently added the 2 year old "slow" Silkie to the group. Is this a bad idea? He has been around them as chicks and used to actually rooster mother them, but I know how hormones can be with teenage boys.

    They are all sweet to me so far. I can pick them up with no problems and walk around with them in my arms with no struggling but i don't want them breeding my hens. What does everyone else do with their excess roosters, other than butchering? I am relatively green to chickens so I'm just trying to figure out what my options are until I can rehome them or find other living situations.

    Thank you :)
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2014
  2. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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  3. GoldnCornerBrds

    GoldnCornerBrds Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 7, 2014
    USA
    Thank you so much for your in-depth response. It is very helpful to read the social behavior structure response. I can definitely see now that he is a little confused and he was a tractor supply chick impulse buy, which I can see now how poorly bred he is now. So far they are getting along but I'm going to work hard to find them homes asap. Thank you again!
     
  4. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    You're welcome. I hope you have great experiences in future. Sometimes people are turned off roosters by one bad male, but they can be wonderful examples of family birds, devoted fathers and 'husbands'.

    If you want a good male it helps to choose from some place where males and females don't live separated; then you're far more likely to get one with a socially normal mentality.

    Best wishes.
     

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