Is It Necessary to Keep Babies in the Incubator After Hatching?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by adrian, May 13, 2009.

  1. adrian

    adrian Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 12, 2009
    Regina, SK
    Pretty self-explanatory. [​IMG]

    I was wondering because I have a lot of eggs in the incubator as of now. Although it's still very early into incubation, I was considering what to do when they begin hatching. This weekend, I'll be buying a Hovabator Genesis and using that as my incubator, while my current Hovabator turbofan model simply as a hatcher. I'm doing this because I find there is a fine line between the two stages of hatching and the humidity levels required for both stages are extremely crucial. During internal pipping, the eggs must be kept at a low humidity so that the babies don't drown, and during external pipping, the humidity must be very high. Keep in mind I am incubating geese.

    After some amount of thought, I wondered why I couldn't just move newborn chicks into a particularly warm brooder, rather than keeping them in the hatcher (which is actually an incubator) to stomp around, roll the other eggs, and possibly injure themselves on the fan/heating element. I figured this was especially important with geese, as they are very large and clumsy, and as the eggs are large and take up a lot of room in the incubator.

    So is there any specific reason why I can't do this, or would it be fine, given that the babies are kept warm enough?

    ALSO, I should ask about cooling the eggs... It's day 4 and I'm told to cool for about 10 minutes a day, and then spray with warm water. I did this today, but the temperature decided to drop to 97 and even after two hours, not return. Then, when it came time to turn the eggs again, the thing dropped to 92! I am getting so sick of this wafer thermostat model. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2009
  2. BeardedChick

    BeardedChick Chillin' With My Peeps

    You are supposed to leave the incubator closed, reaching in to get them lets the humidity out and can negatively affect your other eggs.

    I leave chicks in as long as necessary, and they do just fine.
     
  3. adrian

    adrian Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 12, 2009
    Regina, SK
    Quote:I'm supposed to leave the incubator closed when?
    And I'm not so worried about the goslings left in the incubator so much as the damage done to the eggs. Goslings are big. They have trouble hatching as it is, without being disoriented by a wandering gosling.

    Now, the real question is: What is the difference between a brooder and an incubator set at the same temperature? How would a warm brooder negatively affect a newborn chick?
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2009
  4. YeOleBroodie

    YeOleBroodie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:It doesn't effect the chicks.

    Having said that, it is opening the bator to pull them out, it can effect your eggs with falling temps and humidity.

    What I do when removing chicks, is I heat up a real damp facecloth, heat it in the microwave for 5 -10 sec. (depends on mico. for time).
    When its ready I open the bator, toss it in and grab the chicks out.
    I have never had any ill effects that way and temps/humidity always stay great.

    What you choose to do of course, is up to you.

    Good luck on your hatch! [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2009
  5. adrian

    adrian Chillin' With My Peeps

    736
    8
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    May 12, 2009
    Regina, SK
    Quote:It doesn't effect the chicks.

    Having said that, it is opening the bator to pull them out, it can effect your eggs with falling temps and humidity.

    What I do when removing chicks, is I heat up a real damp facecloth, heat it in the microwave for 5 -10 sec. (depends on mico. for time).
    When its ready I open the bator, toss it in and grab the chicks out.
    I have never had any ill effects that way and temps/humidity always stay great.

    What you choose to do of course, is up to you.

    Good luck on your hatch! [​IMG]

    Thank you very much! As there are many eggs and geese take so long to hatch, I doubt I'd be able to keep the incubator closed until all eggs were hatched, anyway. I'll just spray a little bit more water in the troughs after I take out a baby, if necessary. I've noticed the humidity level is almost always regained minutes after I close the lid again, so hopefully it will be fine.
     

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