1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Is it possible that a peacock could have genetically bad legs?

Discussion in 'Peafowl' started by SuperPeacockman, Mar 4, 2012.

  1. SuperPeacockman

    SuperPeacockman Chillin' With My Peeps

    873
    5
    139
    Sep 1, 2010
    Long Island, NY
    I have a male peacock who developed a limp this summer. The limp seemed to correct itself but it came ack in November. His legs look fine so I suspect the problem is in his hips. It seems like something turned his hips like 30 degrees in one direction. This causes his train to slump off to that side. At first we attributed it to a minor leg problem he had when he was a chick (him and his sister were our first peafowl, we did not know gamebird feed was bad for them at the time. His sister got a slip tendon and was put down, he got a slight limp that went away after were put him on lower protein food). But I am not really sure. I was wondering what else could cause such a problem. I was also wondering if it could be genetic because one yearling peahen that could be his daughter (I am not sure we don't keep breeding records) has a leg problem. In her problem it seems like her legs are shorter that her flock mates but I am pretty sure she just constantly has the leg joint bent more than the other birds. I was wondering if the leg problem could be genetic, and if he should be removed from the breeding flock or if anyone had solutions to either of the two problems described.
     
  2. stacir

    stacir Out Of The Brooder

    35
    0
    22
    Jun 17, 2010
    I had trouble with my peafowl limping a year ago, and couldn't figure out what it was. It seemed like it was only affecting one leg in each bird, but the majority of my birds had it. It turned out to be gout from too much protein. I was feeding them cat food as treats, and was obviously giving them too much. I decreased the amount and the limping went away.
     
  3. SuperPeacockman

    SuperPeacockman Chillin' With My Peeps

    873
    5
    139
    Sep 1, 2010
    Long Island, NY
    I had not thought of gout but they definitely don't have too high protein as my dad bought cracked corn for them because he forgot I told him corn was no good (next time we buy feed we will get the right stuff).
     
  4. stacir

    stacir Out Of The Brooder

    35
    0
    22
    Jun 17, 2010
    The vet said it could also be from dehydration....
     
  5. SuperPeacockman

    SuperPeacockman Chillin' With My Peeps

    873
    5
    139
    Sep 1, 2010
    Long Island, NY
    Hmm... I don't thinks so but I will see if he is drinking or not.
     
  6. deerman

    deerman Rest in Peace 1949-2012

    9,491
    29
    293
    Aug 24, 2008
    Southern Ohio
    Was it a defect at hatching.....If so it could be, only way to know on genetic is if he pass it to his off spring.

    My guess it could been a injury , even a bad landing from a high roost.

    Stacir is correct to high protein (over 24) will cause leg problem like gout.
     
  7. SuperPeacockman

    SuperPeacockman Chillin' With My Peeps

    873
    5
    139
    Sep 1, 2010
    Long Island, NY
    Thanks deerman he is an awkward flyer so I could easily see him hurting himself landing. Any ideas on the yearling with the legs that seem shorter?
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by