Is it Scaly leg mites? Photos attached

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Yvonne49, Dec 26, 2018.

  1. Yvonne49

    Yvonne49 In the Brooder

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    Hi all,

    Whilst dusting my chickens this morning for lice and mites (we have an infestation), I noticed these scaly, lumpy legs and feet. They look so uncomfortable! What does it look like to you? Scaly leg mites?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Wickedchicken6

    Wickedchicken6 No Rest for the Wicked

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    Hello! Those are good pics! They help a lot. There are 2 things going on.

    The raised scales on the top of the leg would be due to scaly mites. But on the bottom of the foot, that's an infection called bumblefoot. Each issue requires a different treatment.
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2018
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  3. Wickedchicken6

    Wickedchicken6 No Rest for the Wicked

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    Here are a couple of threads on scaly leg mites.

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/threads/scaly-leg-mites.1285294/
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/th...asiest-quickest-solution-scaley.33903/page-72

    I've tried different methods. My personal favorite is to use the cheapest cooking spray and treat my birds' legs with this. I have over a hundred birds to treat and when I treat, I treat every bird. The cooking spray is the easiest and quickest way for me to treat that many birds at one time. One can treats most of the birds; it's also cost-effective. Some of the birds will work at their legs after I've sprayed them and it's the reason I've moved to an edible oil from non-edible oils. (petroleum jelly, baby oil etc)

    I've used old olive oil that's no longer good for cooking. But I find olive oil tends to drip off where the cooking spray sticks on the legs. I am careful about having ventilation while I'm spraying since the cans are pressurized and I use the whole can at one time.

    This site explains the mite, what it does and the life cycle. Because their life cycle is 10-14 days...I do not treat every day. I aim for treating every 4-7 days, simply because I have so many birds.
    http://www.poultrydvm.com/condition/scaly-leg-mites


    Below is another good link with a detailed explanation of what bumblefoot is. I haven't had much experience with this. Perhaps someone who has experience can add good advice regarding this issue.
    http://www.poultrydvm.com/condition/bumblefoot
     
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  4. Cragg Klefor

    Cragg Klefor Crowing

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    That's a bad case of bumblefoot and needs to be taken care if asap. Do you have a vet experienced in treating birds?

    For the bumblefoot you are going to need to start soaking those feet in epsom salt water for as long as you and the chicken can manage without getting stressed (Aim for 15-20 minutes min). Then you will need to see if you can rub off that scab (use your thumb nail works well) and then see if you can squeeze out some of that infection. The infection will be in a solid form so will take working out between your thumbs (try to get it all - it may take soaking for a few days to be able to do this). It may all come out in a lump (more common) or a stringy substance. . For the texture think a hard cheese.
    The hens feet will then need to be treated with neosporin ointment and packed with vetericyn gel (in the holes where the scabs were) and covered with vet wrap, then bandaged. This can take quite some time to heal and you will need to ensure no dirt enters the wounds or the infection will reoccur. The bandages will need to be changed daily at first and then depending on how well they are healing, every second day and so follows.

    Some people prefer to perform bumblefoot surgery straight away with a scalpel, but the above is least invasive and I think warrants a try first.

    While you are treating the bumblefoot it will give you a good chance to apply the oil for for the scaly leg mites too.
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2018
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  5. Yvonne49

    Yvonne49 In the Brooder

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    Awwww our poor chicken!! We inherited these chickens when we purchased a house about a month ago and they are in such poor condition. I am located in Victoria, Australia so we don’t have neosporin or vetericyn gel. In Australia, we cannot purchase anything with antibiotics over the counter, we would need a prescription from a doctor-imagine their face when I tell them it’s for my chicken!! Do you think that once I get the plug out, it would be sufficient to flush it with saline and then apply some betadine or Dettol ointment? I have posted pictures of those products so you have any idea of what I’m talking about. Cheers.
    67C1534B-4459-4E55-8AD2-5787D29CCBCA.jpeg C39EF6CE-D06F-4FC7-8F95-CF7E3F75E103.jpeg
     
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  6. Cragg Klefor

    Cragg Klefor Crowing

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    I think Betadine is fine but I don't think Dettol is ok for chickens.
    Hopefully someone else can offer some other substitute for you. I personally have used similiar to Betadine and then lashed on Manuka Honey then wrapped and this has worked great for me :oops:
     
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  7. Wickedchicken6

    Wickedchicken6 No Rest for the Wicked

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    Dettol - I'm uncertain about. I think of it more for topical use. The liquid does say that it's a wound cleaner and practically non-toxic to birds. But it is very lethal to cats and other species. Yours is a cream version. It may be a good choice as long as you have no pet cats that can be exposed.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chloroxylenol

    Betadine - I'm more familiar with using betadine for topical use and a surgical scrub but it does state it is used for mucous membranes in the first paragraph and further that povidone-iodine is an iodophore that is used as a disinfectant and antiseptic mainly for the treatment of contaminated wounds and pre-operative preparation of the skin and mucous membranes as well as for disinfection of equipment. Here is more information:
    https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/Povidone-iodine#section=Therapeutic-Uses
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Povidone-iodine

    I've used Chlorhexidine disinfectant for 20 years because I've always understood that Chlorhexidine is safe for tissue.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chlorhexidine
    https://www.drugbank.ca/drugs/DB00878

    Both Betadine and Chlorhexidine products appear to be used for minor wounds. It appears Betadine can be absorbed by the body. If it's hens you are treating, perhaps one shouldn't eat the eggs until the treatment is finished. (I take things further and we don't consume eggs from a hen that's ill or fighting an infection)

    One note of caution. Because of the bacteria that can be present in the foot wounds, it is important to use gloves (nitrile, latex or vinyl) to protect yourself. The last thing you want is to aquire a staph infection or the like by accident. It's always best to be safe when dealing with any type of infection in your chickens/pets.:)
     
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  8. Yvonne49

    Yvonne49 In the Brooder

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    Ok thanks. I have looked for Chlorhexidine here in Australis and these are the two things I’ve been able to source. The Savlon being the easier of the two to obtain. Should the Savlon be on to use on chicken foot? Bumblefoot is out and about with her sisters this morning exploring, I had to go and shut our front gate as they have wandered quite far today, and of course they think I’m chasing them once they realise I don’t have food. I never noticed before but poor Bumblefoot was at the back of the crew trying to keep up. She couldn’t run as fast-probably doesn’t help that she is quite fat, but her poor feet!

    12F2DD66-37B1-4876-8C98-39CAB1F390B1.jpeg F8F2D2B9-0853-44C4-886F-A7D3715CD528.jpeg 52DE666E-C735-49DC-9781-BBFCBF599EFC.png
     
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  9. Yvonne49

    Yvonne49 In the Brooder

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    I took her to the vet today. The prognosis was not good. She was put to sleep. I have a very heavy heart. Thanks for your advice everyone.
     
  10. Cragg Klefor

    Cragg Klefor Crowing

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    Oh no I'm so sorry!!! :hugs
    What did the vet say?
     
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