Is it two years from hatch date, or two years from egg laying date?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by jerseygirl1, Jan 12, 2011.

  1. jerseygirl1

    jerseygirl1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The 'two years' part is only an example, since it varies. But curious, when we talk about egg-laying capacity, are we talking about from the time the bird hatches or the time the bird has actually started to lay eggs? Example, (only example) - buff orps may lay for two or three years, is that two or three egg laying years, which is actually when they may be 16 weeks old OR is it two or three years from date of hatch? Just looking for what we all classify egg laying as. Some posts say 'when the chicken is two or three years old' other posts say 'they stop laying after two or three years'
     
  2. BigDaddy'sGurl

    BigDaddy'sGurl Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 14, 2010
    Wilkesboro NC
    GOOD question! Hadn't thought of it...hope you get an anwer soon!
     
  3. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    I believe that a pullet year, is that pullet's first full year of laying. I believe you begin the "year" from her onset of laying.
    Thus, hatched in January, begins laying in May, her pullet year would be May until anniversary date the following May.

    This is the way I keep my logs, right or wrong.
     
  4. jerseygirl1

    jerseygirl1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Fred's Hens :

    I believe that a pullet year, is that pullet's first full year of laying. I believe you begin the "year" from her onset of laying.
    Thus, hatched in January, begins laying in May, her pullet year would be May until anniversary date the following May.

    This is the way I keep my logs, right or wrong.

    That's what I use, just curious about what others do
    Thanks, guys!

    Edited to say, I will now use your description as 'a pullet year' - definition : not birth date,but actual date the pullet starts laying
    GREAT! Need to put this in the Chicken Dictionary​
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2011
  5. dandelionheart

    dandelionheart Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So a pullet is a pullet for a year after her first egg? Pretty new here. I'd assumed it was just their first year of life (hatch date + a year of being a pullet = hen). I suppose I can still give them a hatchday party anyway. [​IMG]
     
  6. dandelionheart

    dandelionheart Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I guess that means that I am only 19 in chicken years. [​IMG] Whoo hoo - I'll have to tell Hubby. [​IMG]
     
  7. jerseygirl1

    jerseygirl1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Go for it!

    Yes, what Fred calls 'a pullet year' is the first full year of laying, their first year of life would be the hatch date. Technically, that is about four or more months prior to their pullet life:)
     
  8. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    It is basically two seasons of laying. Also the "2 years" is a generalization. Properly managed even production birds will continue laying throughout their lifetime though at a reduced non economical rate.
     
  9. HorizonSon

    HorizonSon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It is my understanding (mostly from reading), that production Leghorns and production Rhode Islands are quite productive for 1.5~2.5 years. Meaning 2~3 years from hatch date... For heritage egg and dual purpose breeds, should be able to add another year or two to that of the production breeds (in theory)...

    Note: the lady only has so many eggs... then menopause... then she's an ol' hen [​IMG]
     
  10. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Instead of years, you might think in terms of egg laying seasons.

    The adult molt is what controls it. It will vary by individuals, so you need enough laying hens for averages to mean something, but what will usually happen on average for a large flock of hens is that the egg size and general quality will usually go up after their first adult molt. This may be shortly after they start to lay or a long time after they start to lay. Commercial operations will often force a molt after the pullets have been laying a while to get the larger eggs that grade out better since they get more money for those larger eggs. Before that first adult molt, they will usually lay real well, but the eggs are not as large.

    After their second adult molt, the eggs may get a little larger but the number of eggs usually drops off by about 15%. Remember, this is on average. After each following adult molt, production drops on average another 15%.

    If you have four laying hens, the averages probably don't mean a lot, plus you are not as likely to notice a 15% drop. After two or three adult molts, you will notice. If you have a hundred hens, yeah, you would probably notice that the first year.

    Hope this makes some sense.
     

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