Is my cockerel aggressive??

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by ChickenNugget123, Jul 13, 2019 at 6:53 PM.

  1. ChickenNugget123

    ChickenNugget123 Hatching

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    Hi! So a few months ago I got a group of four chickens. 2 Crested Cream Legbars and 1faverolles Cockerel and 1 Faverolles hen. I had raised many sets of hens of all different breeds in the past but had never had a rooster and wanted to try one out. I read that Salmon Faverolles are a pretty docile breed so I figured he wouldn’t be aggressive. He has been super sweet and cute until a few days ago when he lunged at my dad. I then watched him act aggressively toward the hens (especially the one Faverolles hen).I was worried he was getting aggressive toward humans but I went out and sat with him and he didn’t lunge or or try to attack me. My dad hasn’t really been around them much so could he just be trying to protect the flock? I also notice that some days he is more aggressive to the hens and my dog and then others he is as sweet as can be. He is around four months so is maturing into a Rooster. Also he hasn’t crowed yet and is still peeping so maybe he’s just a late bloomer? Also my older chickens from a different flock single him out and run after him is it because he’s a rooster? Please help me! I don’t know much about cockerel behaviors so I need some help! (Below is a picture of him I took today)
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  2. DobieLover

    DobieLover Easily distracted by chickens

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    I'm still doing a lot of learning with my SF rooster. Your cockerel would be better off if you kept him with the older flock as they will teach that boy manners.
    @Shadrach has a very good article on Understanding Your Rooster that you would benefit from reading. More than once. With a large cup of coffee because it is long but well worth it.
    Your cockerel is just starting to feel his oats. His behavior is going to change as those hormones keep raging. I recommend boots and jeans when you tend the flock. One would have to know what human behavior triggered the attack to know if he is generally aggressive towards humans or reacted to a perceived threat. There is a lot involved with understanding these boys and they do change your flock dynamics and how you should behave among the flock.
    Ironically, I am working with my SF rooster after many months of his flogging me for doing construction in his territory. Thankfully, the bulk of the work is over and I've had no further issues with him. He still hates me and watches me like a hawk, but no more attacks.
     
  3. ChickenNugget123

    ChickenNugget123 Hatching

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    Thank you so much! I’ll be sure to check out that article!
     
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  4. NewChickenmama06

    NewChickenmama06 Songster

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    Hi, I am also still learning about cockerel behavior as well. My black Australorp cockerel is about 4 months now and just started to do the same kinds of things. It started maybe 3 weeks ago. Before then he was fine. Just this morning I was going to change water for the flock and he bit my foot as I was stepping into the run. He started to do this funny sideways dance too, but he doesn't attack when he does that.
    I wish I could help, but I'm still learning. I am going to check out the article that DobieLover attached (thank you) I'm sure it will benefit us both. Good luck and welcome to the BYC flock!!:love
     
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  5. DobieLover

    DobieLover Easily distracted by chickens

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    He's trying to herd you. It's not a sign of aggression. I think it is very funny when my boy does that to me! He looks ridiculous.
    Just a few tips other than the boots and jeans: move at a slow steady pace when moving through the birds, don't challenge him, DON'T hurt him (this will only make things worse), don't hand feed HIS girls (yes, if you keep a cockerel/rooster in your flock, you have a rooster and HE has pullets/hens - that's just the way it is) and try to spend time observing your flock by just sitting in a chair and watching them. You learn a lot that way. Don't interfere with their pecking order business unless someone is outright being attacked. Give the flock as much space as you absolutely can. That will essentially eliminate abnormal behavioral issues.
     
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  6. Chickassan

    Chickassan Wattle Fondler

    Agree, put him with the old ladies!
    Warning: They will chase him and be mean but it is O.K!
    These guys normally make wonderful roosters, but they need training lest they become spoiled brats.
    You have trainers, let the ladies work. ;)
     
  7. NewChickenmama06

    NewChickenmama06 Songster

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    Lol it does look pretty funny when he does that! I do have a chair out there to watch them. I will admit I have been hand feeding the pullets along with him. He usually grabs as much as he can away from them. I guess I need to stop that. I have never hurt him, just gently pushed him out of the way with my hand a few times. I try to pick him up, but he runs away and I can't get him. I don't want him to think I'm trying to hurt him. I read the article and it has some great info!
     
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  8. ChickenNugget123

    ChickenNugget123 Hatching

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    Should I keep them in the same coop?
     
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  9. Chickassan

    Chickassan Wattle Fondler

    Yes, but make sure he has a place to get away if he has to.:)
     
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  10. Folly's place

    Folly's place Free Ranging

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    I don't hand feed or handle my cockerels; they need to respect my space. I wear jeans and shoes or boots, and walk through the flock, and through them, expecting them to get out of my way, every time!
    I think you can make pets out of the pullets, but 'hands off' the cockerels works out better, most of the time.
    It takes experience to understand signals the bird send out, well before those first misbehaviors, and attacks.
    Any breed cockerel can turn out well, or be an idiot who attacks the giants who bring food. Favorelles are more likely to be sweet than, for example, hatchery RIRs, but that's not 100% true.
    In my experience, the 'sweet, friendly' cockerels are often the bold boys who are sizing you up, and turn into human aggressive roosters. I want the cockerels who avoid me because they are focused on the hens and pullets, watching their environment, and generally more involved being a chicken, than interested in human interactions.
    Mary
     
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