Is my coop ready?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Madisan, Oct 27, 2015.

  1. Madisan

    Madisan Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This was the day the coop was built before I ever had chickens. They have shelter but it was not in the coop yet in this picture.
     
  2. Madisan

    Madisan Chillin' With My Peeps

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    They have shelter but it was not in the coop yet in this picture. I just wanted to show you guys what my coop is like
     
  3. Madisan

    Madisan Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I already took their shelter out and sanitized it with bleach and water because their shelter is moveable. That's why I was asking if I had done enough?
     
  4. Blooie

    Blooie Team Spina Bifida Premium Member

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    My Coop
    Oh, okay. So we just have a little miscommunication and what we refer to as a "run" you are calling your entire "coop". So about that shelter. How big is it? 6x10 is not very big for 9 chickens, especially when you lose part of that space to putting your coop inside. Is the coop ventilated as well? What did you use for litter on the floor? What kind of predator protection do you add to the chain link. Snakes can get through that very easily and kill birds, then leave them when they find out they are too big to eat. Raccoons can reach right through the chain link and pull a chicken to it, then kill it and eat what it can reach. Weasels can skitter right through it and raise havoc.

    If you've replaced feeders and the waterer, bleached out every surface, pulled the old dirt and removed it then "cleaned" the new exposed area, I suppose that sanitation wise you've done all you can. But I'm really sorry - there are just so many issues I see with just putting them and a small shelter within an overcrowded, insecure area that I'm afraid you are going to lose birds regardless of what sanitation methods you have used, especially if your first flock did perhaps have a communicable disease and only 9 days have passed.

    My suggestion, although I'm sure you have enough worry without me adding to it, is to take the opportunity while your chicks are young to build a more secure coop and run. Get a shed from a home improvement store and start from scratch, adding roosts, ventilation, your nest boxes, (although it will be some time before they need those) and a secure run, and if possible don't set it up on the same spot. You have a couple of weeks yet, and can even stretch that time out if you need to. Get some hardware cloth over that chain link if that's what you still want to use and you can move it over. Since it's been disinfected, I don't see any problem with re-using it.

    Forgive me for being so blunt, but that's just how I see it. Perhaps some with more experience than I have can give you better ideas. Don't get discouraged and give up! You have 9 Littles counting on you to provide them with a safe and secure home and you are lucky that you have time to accomplish that yet.
     
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  5. Madisan

    Madisan Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't know how big my shelter was measuring wise because my neighbor built it for me. And I was actually planning on selling 3 of the chicks and only having 6 because I don't want it overcrowded. And for the bedding I use pine shavings. And my coop is cemented all the way around 2 feet deep to try and keep anything from digging under and I have chain link on the top of the whole coop that keeps stuff from coming in the top. I live in a urban area so we don't have much critters lurking around. We do have Hawks. And I do free range my chickens daily and I will be with these too. The only time they are ever in the coop is at night or if it's raining
     
  6. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    That's a run, not a coop. A coop is the secure shelter where they spend their nights and lay their eggs. That run is only big enough for 6 grown birds, without a coop inside, taking up sq footage. And any bird that roosts in there is at risk of being pulled apart, alive, and eaten by racoons. Coops need lots of ventilation.
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2015
  7. Madisan

    Madisan Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes if you read above I did have a shelter for them that was not in the coop when the picture was taken :) and I only had 5 chickens before and they were bantams. I am planning on selling 3 of my new chicks and just keeping 6! :)
     
  8. Madisan

    Madisan Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm actually thinking about doing what blooie said and might just start over at a different location of my property
     
  9. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    It's still going to be crowded if the coop is in there, as well. General run size for most medium sized breeds (Leghorn types) is 10 sq ft per bird. Larger, dual purpose breeds need even more space. Can you post a picture of the coop (shelter)? We might be able to help you improve their housing so that you can avoid illness as much as possible.
     
  10. Madisan

    Madisan Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The shelter that they had was just an old dog house that my neighbor didn't use anymore. It was a large dog house and he was able to build 2 nesting boxes and 2 roosts in their for them. The chickens loved to go in it. But I am not using that type of shelter for the new ones. I am considering buying one of the already built coops that you can order online? That seems like the way to go because I want these chickens to have a long safe and happy life
     

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