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is my dog guilty

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by SpidersHuman, Jul 24, 2014.

  1. SpidersHuman

    SpidersHuman Chirping

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    I'm going to apologises in advance cause this most likely will be long but I need y'alls opinion on who done this.
    First my set up is 2 12 x 12 horse stalls attached to a fairly large fenced in yard. My birds (16 chickens and 14 ducks) are locked in separate stalls at night butv allowed freerange of the fenced in area from 8 to 8 (during daylight period). This has been the set up for 2months with no issue. I also have a 7 yr old obese black lab that I've owned his whole life. He spends 99% loose he's very loyal. So here's what happened.
    I let everyone out at 8 am went back inside to deal with my kiddos. Went back out at 10 am with treats. My Chihuahuah been on the back porchon his run the whole time within few of the coop and he goes bananas if there is anything strange in his yard. I firston the outside of my coop beside the barn I find my little roo dead. I round the corner to find dead chickens all over my coop with minimal damage no evidence on any of the 15 corpsesthat the killwr tried to eat them. Whomever did it left a fat dog whole leading under thegate. Where wire had been torn up!they only got one duck the others were cowering in the open stall and whatever it waswas gone and left them by choice.
    There is nodoubt in my mind the culprit was my dog. I think that cause what other preditors, come out in day time, would slaughter all the chickens but not the ducks, and without eating/ mauling/ or stealing them for dinner. There are some (ie dh) who think it was a random predator because the dog had behaved for si long. But 4yrs prior said dog was caugyt killing neighbors chickens before we moved. What are y'alls thoughts?
     
  2. jeepguy982001

    jeepguy982001 Songster

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    sorry but the dog sounds like the culprit to me.
     
  3. SpidersHuman

    SpidersHuman Chirping

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    Thank you just wanted opinions before we get rid of said dog. We don't have pet killers on our farm.
     
  4. Foxes are known to hunt during daylight if there are coyotes around. I've had fox attacks anywhere from 9 am to 4 pm. Setting up a trail camera will give you proof, if dog or other predator.
     
  5. SpidersHuman

    SpidersHuman Chirping

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    Wouldn't a fox or coyote have taken something to eat later or atleast taken bites off while killing. Not one bird body is missing. And none have anything but minimal puncture wounds. There was no blood on ground and birds were not bloody.
     
  6. Ok...looking more like the dog did it. :( That sucks.
     
  7. islandgirl82

    islandgirl82 Songster

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    I have a newfoundland who alerts me about everything strange in the yard...except for fox and a couple years ago I lost 8 ducks and 5 chickens to them. He didn't even bother to go after it when I was about 50ft away from it, throwing rocks and screaming at it like a mad woman. Both he and the fox just looked at me like I was nuts.

    If it were me, I'd be looking around the hole to see if I find hairs that were snagged from your culprit by the fencing...that would give a much better idea as to who it was before making a final decision about the dog. I'd also be looking for extra dirty paws and belly on the dog and paw prints in the run. Fox paws are considerably smaller than a lab's.
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2014
  8. SpidersHuman

    SpidersHuman Chirping

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    The dog in question was very wet and muddy. He was found hiding in front yard and appeared very guilty by the way he tucked his tail when called. The only reason I can think he spared my duck is he has been around them loose in the yard and has got scolded for even looking at anything that quacked. There was no hair snagged on fence or discernable paw prints.
     
  9. islandgirl82

    islandgirl82 Songster

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    Nooo!!
     
  10. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Free Ranging Premium Member 8 Years

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    Have you ever put any training time on that dog? If you've only had the chickens for two months and haven't actually put time in to teach the dog to leave them alone, I can see where there would be potential for a problem, and really unfair to blame the dog. You're sure the dog dug under the fence? If you're attached to the dog, I'd suggest putting some training time on him, and reinforcing your pen. After all, if the obese lab could get in, it will be no problem at all for a fox, raccoon, or coyote. You could put a couple of strands of electric fence around the pen. That would discourage digging and climbing. How many puncture wounds did the birds have? Weasels or mink will bite the bird - with my flock it was either on the neck or just under the wing - and drain/drink/lap the blood.
     

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